Break Out of Your Routine: An Interview with Nature Photographer Jim Goldstein

Break Out of Your Routine: An Interview with Nature Photographer Jim Goldstein

Jim Goldstein is a professional photographer based out of San Francisco, California who specializes in outdoor and nature photography. Jim infuses elements of the natural world into his commercial and editorial work to express his passion about nature and the environment. A member of the American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP), Jim produces the highest quality photography for both commercial clients and fine art photography collectors.

Shoot Often to Build Confidence: An Interview with Portrait Photographer Neil Creek

Shoot Often to Build Confidence: An Interview with Portrait Photographer Neil Creek

Neil Creek is a photographer with ten years of experience and a passion for teaching. He has helped tens of thousands of people improve their photography with his eBooks, successful video training courses, photography workshops, and years of photography blogging. As a professional photographer specializing in portrait photography, Neil has picked up lots of ideas, techniques and problems to watch out for that are usually learned the hard way. Neil has a talent for taking difficult-to-understand concepts and making them accessible

New Gear: The Metabones Nikon to Fuji Speedbooster

New Gear: The Metabones Nikon to Fuji Speedbooster

Not too long ago, following the release of Fuji’s most recent firmware update for its X lineup of cameras, I posted an article about extending the Fuji system with Leica lenses using the Fuji X mount to Leica M mount adapter. Indeed, this adapter, along with the Leica 90mm Summarit f/2.5 lens, is my standard portrait setup today. Recently, however, we got in yet another adapter for the Fuji X-mount, and this one’s a total doozy.   The Metabones Nikon to Fuji Speedbooster does for Nikon lenses (including the “G” lenses, which don’t have a manual aperture ring) what the M to X-mount adapter does for Leica lenses – it lets you put them onto Fuji’s X-series cameras, including the X-Pro1, which we rent. Now, if that’s all it did, I’d be pretty pleased as punch that we had added it to our inventory. But adapting the lens is only part of the equation here. First, the adapter works for a much wider variety of lenses. Traditionally, Nikon’s “D” series lenses have been the most easily adapted lenses for other systems, as they have a manual aperture ring and therefore can be used in aperture-priority mode on almost all the mirrorless cameras out there, with adapters. The “G” lenses, however, don’t have aperture rings, so they’re not as easy to adapt. The Metabones adapter gets around this limitation by offering its own aperture ring that maneuvers the tiny iris lever inside the G lens to change the aperture. The aperture ring has an 8-f-stop range ring, with half-stop markings. I have to wonder how accurate this is; what if...
Sample Images: Benefits of Shooting Olympus and Four Thirds/Micro Four Thirds

Sample Images: Benefits of Shooting Olympus and Four Thirds/Micro Four Thirds

Mirrorless cameras and the Micro Four Thirds (MFT) system are gaining in popularity. From Panasonic’s GH3 to the Blackmagic, more and more cameras are coming out in MFT mount. Olympus originally pioneered the Four Thirds system and, along with Panasonic, announced a new Micro Four Thirds standard in 2008. This new system increased in quality while decreasing in bulk.

Three Key Methods For Backing Up Your Photographs

Three Key Methods For Backing Up Your Photographs

Zach Egolf is an IT professional and freelance photographer in the Baltimore area. In this guest post, he explains three methods for backing up your files in preparation for the worst possible scenario. The Importance of Back…Back…Backing Up reprinted with permission by Zach Egolf Wandering into the world of photography without a backup plan is a lot like wandering into…well, just about anything blindfolded!  You might think you know the terrain, how to navigate it, and where you’re going, but the next thing you know you’ve wandered into a forest, caught yourself on some thorn bushes, and lost your pants.  And much like losing your pants in an evil forest, losing your photos can be a frightening ordeal. Think of this scenario: You spend 10 hours shooting the perfect wedding.  The colors are all perfect, the lighting is spot-on, the bride and groom photograph like the two greatest love birds in the world.  You get home to your computer, pull all of the photos off of your memory cards, and then go to bed.  A wedding is a long day, after all, and you want to get your rest so that you can wake up the next morning and start working your magic! The next day comes along and you start to edit the photos.  Two days pass, you’re halfway through the photos and, all of a sudden, a freak storm rolls through town and zaps your house, frying your external hard drives, and wiping out 10 hours worth of photos.  You have nothing to deliver to your clients except the crisp shell of metal and magnets.  You have...
SnapKnot’s Favorite Beach Wedding & Engagement Photos

SnapKnot’s Favorite Beach Wedding & Engagement Photos

Photographers are always seeking ways to land that one awesome wedding shot. The unique setting, timing, and location of each photo opportunity is what makes the final product so special. In order to share some brilliant inspiration, we had our friends at SnapKnot send five of their favorite beach wedding and engagement photos from their expert photographers. Better yet, they shared the secrets behind their incredible shots. SnapKnot’s Favorite Beach Wedding & Engagement Photos This portrait was taken at sunrise just after a short ceremony with a Canon 5D Mark II and a 24-70 f/2.8L. Only natural lighting was used for this at ISO 320, f/2.8, and 1/1000th of a second. This well-timed candid was taken in the late afternoon after a heavy rain with a Canon 5D and a 24-105mm f/4L using only available light. Taken at ISO 400, f/5.6, and 1/250th of a second. This trash-the-dress shot was taken early in the morning with a Canon 5D Mark III and 135mm f/2L. No flash was used; instead, King captured the moment by taking super quick, multiple shots. Taken at ISO 800, f/6.3, and 1/1000th of a second. This scenic portrait was taken at sunset with a Canon 1D Mark IV and a 16-35mm f/2.8. To light the scene, Joy used 2 Canon 580EX II flashes triggered in ETTL mode with remotes. Final settings: ISO 200, f/2.8, and 1/1600th of a second. White balance was manually set. To learn more about triggering flashes at high shutter speeds, see Syl Arena’s tutorial on using high speed sync with Canon flash. This romantic silhouette was taken at sunrise with a...