Tip of the week: An adaptable camera system

Tip of the week: An adaptable camera system

Every Thursday, we will post a photography-related tip here. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. Today we’re going to talk about a video camera called the Panasonic AG AF100. The AF100 is from a family of products that adhere to the Micro Four-Thirds standard. So far, Olympus and Panasonic are the two manufacturers making cameras for this standard, but a number of other manufacturers have also signed on to produce add-ons for it. Sigma, Carl Zeiss, Lensbaby and Voigtlander, all venerable manufacturers, have signed on to make lenses for it. But the true power of this standard comes from the manufacturers that have built adapters that let you bring a variety of non Micro Four-Thirds lenses to this platform. Voigtlander and Redrock Micro are some of the companies that make adapters that will let you use Leica, Canon and Nikon lenses on a Micro Four-Thirds camera. The image above is of a Canon-mount CP.2 lens from Zeiss, with an adapter that let us put it on an Olympus E-P2 Micro Four-Thirds camera. There was a little play in the fit, but it worked well enough. The CP.2 was a lens designed specifically for video. With the same adapter shown in the image, you can also adapt that lens to the Panasonic AF100, opening up a wide range of cinematic possibilities. But that’s not all. Take that Nikon F mount adapter we rent and you can take Nikon’s...
Tip of the week: Making sense of PocketWizards, Part I

Tip of the week: Making sense of PocketWizards, Part I

Making sense of PocketWizards, Part I. The increasing interest in off-camera flash has led to a number of our customers requesting PocketWizards to trigger off-camera flashes. The problem is, there isn’t just one single PocketWizard available to rent – there are no less than a half-dozen transmitters you have to chose from and just as many receivers. Since there are several combinations of cameras and lights you could be using, this blog entry won’t focus on giving you the list of things you would need for each imaginable combination. Instead, we’ll focus on the basics of PocketWizards and help you figure out what you’re going to need. The Broad Categories of PocketWizards In essence, PocketWizard’s products can be broken down into two key areas: Standard PocketWizards (also called PWs in the lingo) and ControlTL PocketWizards (ControlTL = Control The Light). We’ll address standard PocketWizards today, with a tip on how to select and use ControlTL PocketWizards in a future tip. Standard PocketWizards These are the original PocketWizards, the ones that are the mainstay of many professionals, if not most. They are both transmitters and receivers (called transceivers) and can be used interchangeably. There are two products in this category. PocketWizard Plus II This is the workhorse of the photographic industry. Relatively small and simple to use, it runs off 2 AA batteries and has four seperate channels it can use for transmission. These are considered to be the most reliable PocketWizard, and they see more use than any other version of PocketWizard as well. So, how would you use this? Here are a few combinations. You have a camera...
Tip of the week: Choosing a photo bag

Tip of the week: Choosing a photo bag

  Welcome to a recurring feature on The Blog @ BorrowLenses.com. Every Thursday, we will post a photography-related tip here. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com This week’s tip (or, more accurately, collection of tips): Choosing a bag to lug your gear around in. Don’t go for the biggest bag you can find. One mistake customers make all the time is to pick the largest bag they can find. The thinking is that you should grab a bag that’ll fit all the gear you might need someday if you ever went on a long photo-heavy trip. Might and if are bad foundations on which to chose something that you’re likely to use on a frequent basis. That kind of thinking is called “Worst-Case Shopping” and is not the best way to chose your bag. This is not the last bag you’ll buy. Photographers who’ve been doing this for a while will attest to this: you will buy more than one camera bag in your lifetime. Actually, if you do it long enough, you’ll end up with more bags than you could possibly need. Your bags will require their own closet. It’s just a fact of photographic life. Don’t skimp on price. Bags, tripods, tripod heads, lenses. These are the things you do NOT skimp or cut corners on. Your bag isnt’ just a container for gear – if it were, you could just as easily carry your stuff in...
Our top 5 learning resources for photographers

Our top 5 learning resources for photographers

Here’s what we’ve come to realize after more than four years in the business: our customers don’t fit any one particular mold. We have rank amateurs, passionate about photography and picking up a DSLR for the first time. We have photographers about to go into business for themselves after years of shooting for pleasure. We also have high-end customers for whom a ten-camera shoot is just another Tuesday. Whether you’re that rank amateur or that budding professional or that seasoned veteran of the industry, the one thing you can never stop doing is learning. Constant education is a requirement in this industry and those who don’t evolve are doomed to extinction. With that in mind, we put together a small list of educational resources that we go to constantly, be it for a quick lookup on a specific technique, or for inspiration when we’re in a rut. There’s a little something here for everyone regardless of your skill level. So, here are our top five learning resources, in no particular order. 1) creativeLIVE The brainchild of photographer Chase Jarvis, creativeLIVE has, arguably, one of the most unique business models in the industry. Chase brings in marquee names like Vince Laforet, Gale Tattersall, Mark Wallace, Tamara Lackey and Bambi Cantrell to do classes ranging from one to four days in length (and sometimes longer). The classes are broadcast live, completely free of charge. During the broadcast period, you have the option of purchasing the downloadable video files for a reduced price. That price usually goes up at the end of the broadcast period. The educators are top-notch and the classes...