Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive

Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Creative Suite Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His latest article guides novice Lightroom users and those confused when linking a Lightroom library with  an updated hard drive configuration. Continue on if you have ever experienced those perplexing question marks when attempting to work with a previously imported file within Lightroom. Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive by Seán Duggan One sure thing about digital photography is that, like the universe, your image library and the amount of hard drive space it requires is always expanding. And, if you’ve upgraded to a camera with more megapixels, it may be expanding faster than you originally thought it would! As your image archive grows you’ll eventually run out of space on your current hard drive or drives and you’ll need to move the files onto newer and larger capacity storage media. In this short episode of the Lightroom Viewfinder, I will show you how to move your Lightroom image library onto a new hard drive and then re-link everything to the Lightroom catalog file so you don’t run into those vexing question marks that appear when Lightroom can’t find the folder it’s looking for. Seán Duggan is the co-author of Photoshop Masking & Composting, Real World Digital Photography, and The Creative Digital Darkroom. He is on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts in New York City and leads workshops all around the world. See all of Duggan’s Lightroom tips below: • Lightroom Keywording Tips • Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog • Adding Value to Your Image Archive with Keywords •...
A Trip to the Bottom of the World: Photographing Antarctica

A Trip to the Bottom of the World: Photographing Antarctica

It goes without saying that someone interested in traveling to Antarctica can’t simply go online, book a flight and hotel, pack their bags, and shove off like they would for most other international destinations. It can be a daunting task trying to find a reputable tour company that is a good fit for you. I’ve been to Antarctica multiple times and have traveled with more than one tour company. Personally, I recommend Polar Latitudes for someone who has a keen interest in photography. Among other eco-experts at your disposal, Polar Latitudes has a staffed professional photographer on each voyage to instruct its expedition members both onboard and out in the field. It really doesn’t matter if you’ve never picked up a camera or are a professional yourself. You will undoubtedly come back home with the best images possible and expand your technical knowledge. Best Time to Travel For starters, I would avoid the Austral winter, unless you are a research professional who doesn’t have the luxury of picking a time of year to travel. Having said that, there isn’t a “best time” to travel to Antarctica but what you are able to photograph will depend on the time of the year. The Antarctic tour season typically runs from November to March (remember, the seasons are reversed from those in the northern hemisphere). Generally, penguins are on their nests with eggs or giving birth to baby chicks from November to January. Newborn chicks (like the one pictured below at Port Lockroy, Antarctica) can usually be photographed towards the end of the season in January through March. Traveling with Kids Given...
Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog

Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Creative Suite Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His latest article guides novice Lightroom users and anyone having trouble or confusion with the import process. Continue on if you have ever experienced images not ending up where they are intended or in redundant, misplaced nested folders after importing.   Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog by Seán Duggan If you’ve ever imported files into Lightroom and had the files end up in the wrong place, or the import resulted in the creation of redundant nested folders that created confusion in your image archive, this new tutorial video is for you! It shows you how to take control of the Lightroom import process by understanding how the options in the Destination panel affect where the images go and whether or not any nested subfolders are created. Once you know how this panel works, you’ll be the one in the driver’s seat of the Import Dialog, not Lightroom. I also cover how to save Import Presets to improve the speed and accuracy of the import process. Seán Duggan is the co-author of Photoshop Masking & Composting, Real World Digital Photography, and The Creative Digital Darkroom. He is on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts in New York City and leads workshops all around the world. See all of Duggan’s Lightroom tips below: • Lightroom Keywording Tips • Adding Value to Your Image Archive with Keywords • Adobe Lightroom Tips for Beginners: Merging a Travel Catalog with your Main Catalog • Adobe Lightroom Tips for Beginners: The Island of Lost Files • The Lightroom-Photoshop Connection:...
Traveling Cross Country? Tips to Photograph Your Trip: Part 2

Traveling Cross Country? Tips to Photograph Your Trip: Part 2

Shortly after finishing a cross country trip to relocate to a new part of the country, I reflected on some practical photographic lessons I learned. We had to get across the country quickly by car and it is hard to photograph under those circumstance. I compiled some tips for others who may be faced with a similar trip and who want to take pictures along the way. The following are helpful tips for the cross country traveling photographer. Packing a Bag: Bring What You Know, Pack Light I logged a lot of internet hours trying to decide what was best to include in my camera bag before departing. What I ultimately decided on was to pack simple and not include any new systems that may trip me up when trying to act fast. I was very interested in shooting with a mirrorless camera. However, on the test run I decided against it because I was just not familiar enough with it. I knew it was better for me to be able to quickly navigate my settings than to sacrifice for weight and size. Had I gotten comfortable with a more compact system and felt confident that I would be able to act fast with it, I would have certainly opted for a small form factor! Instead I chose a Nikon D7100 for its relatively lightweight body, familiar DSLR controls, and 24MP count with an option to shoot video. The crop sensor was a conscious decision as I am still very excited about using the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC zoom lens and wanted to put it to the the ulitmate test while on the road (it performed fantastically)! The...
Traveling Cross Country? Tips to Photograph Your Trip: Part 1

Traveling Cross Country? Tips to Photograph Your Trip: Part 1

Upon embarking on my first cross-country road trip, I went to the internet in search of tips suggested by fellow photographers who have also made this iconic exploration. To my surprise, there were few contemporary articles published depicting the experience of others in relation to the photographic aspect of the trip. In my search, however, I did come across a wonderfully inspiring photographer, Amelia Fletcher, who, with the help of a crowd-funding website, trekked across the country on a sole mission to photograph its landscape and inhabitants. This type of trek, of course, is nothing new. It follows in the footsteps of world renowned photographers such as Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, Gary Winogrand, and William Eggleston just to name a few (do yourself a favor and look these up!). In this first of a 2 part series, fine art photographer Amelia Fletcher was generous with her time after her trip and answered a few questions for us. Continue reading to discover what she had in her camera bag, how she approached subjects to photograph, and what her best successes and failures were. Tips to Photograph Your Trip: Part 1 BL: What were your photographic intentions and/or goals when you first set out to cross the country by car? AF: My photographic goals were comparable to my other hopes for the trip. I wanted to put myself out there, experience different cultures and ways of life here in the United States, and see this beautiful country we live in as best I could. My hope was that my photos would reflect all of that. Everyone and everything I photographed has some...
Small Business Start Up & Tax Tips for Photographers and Videographers

Small Business Start Up & Tax Tips for Photographers and Videographers

Get a jump start on the impending tax season! If you are considering taking your photography/videography to the next level and becoming a business, you will need to know a few things about taxes. Below is a brief list of things to consider, followed by some links to more in-depth guides. • Determine if your photography/videography officially counts as a hobby or a for-profit endeavor. Here is a guide from the IRS to help you. • If your work is more than a hobby, determine if you should be a Sole Proprietorship, a Partnership, a Limited Liability Company (LLC), an S Corp, or a Corporation. • Get your EIN number. You can apply for one here. • Find a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) with existing clients who are photographers/videographers. • Have ready a tally of income, expenses (travel, equipment, props, software, domain costs, and advertising). Even rentals are potentially tax deductible so save your BorrowLenses receipts! • For any independent contractor you hire for more than $600 in one year, you’ll need to fill out a 1099 form for both that person and the government. For more information, check out the following articles: Special Tax Advice: How Photographers Can Get The Right Look From The I.R.S. Photographer’s Corner: Tips for Tax Time The 7 Common Tax Mistakes Made by Photographers 5 Super Simple Accounting Tips for Photographers Wedding Photographer Tax Tips Also check out 5 Important Photography Business Tips to Start the Year Off Right. Disclaimer: The information contained on this post is provided for reference purposes only and is not a substitute for obtaining accounting, tax, or financial advice from a professional tax planner or financial...
Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses

Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Photoshop Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His Jump Start series provides photographers with the informative ideas to effectively experiment with alternative photographic equipment. Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses by Seán Duggan On my recent Autumn & Aurora Discoveries workshop in Iceland, I decided to step outside my usual focal length comfort zone and do some experimenting with a 15mm fisheye lens on my full-frame Canon DSLR. BorrowLenses.com is a great resource that makes it easy to take different gear for a test drive and I really appreciate the large selection they have. Sometimes a lens is needed for a very specific purpose but at other times I’ll try out a lens simply because it offers such a different perspective from the lenses I normally use. This was the case with the 15mm f/2.8 lens. Most of my wide-angle shots are made at the 24mm focal length, with occasional images made with a 16–35mm. I knew, however, that the 15mm would offer a much different perspective than the 16mm. It is technically only one millimeter of focal length difference but the level of distortion is significantly more with the 15mm lens. Although the super wide angle-of-view was quite useful for some shots, it was actually the distortion that I was most interested in. Shooting straight at the horizon yielded an image that was very wide with not too much distortion but tilting the camera either up or down yielded a very pronounced curvature of the horizon. Tilting up...
1 Easy Way to Guarantee Your Photography Will Improve

1 Easy Way to Guarantee Your Photography Will Improve

How do you make every day count as a photographer? How do you make every day count for yourself? There is 1 major project that thousands of people start every January 1st that improves their lives and it has nothing to do with going to the gym. Photo-a-Day, or 365 Projects, is the secret to success for many photographers of every level. They are fun, challenging, sometimes mundane, sometimes exhilarating, and always a great teacher. Why do people commit to taking a photograph every day for a year – rain or shine, sickness or heath, inspired or not? I will explain the main reasons why Photo-a-Day goals are healthy, what you can do with the results, and how to get started. 3 Reasons to Start Taking 1 Photo Every Day: Presence, Practice, and Purpose Your only requirement for starting a Photo-a-Day project is the desire to participate. There are 3 main reasons photographers make this commitment: Presence, Practice, and Purpose. Let’s look at each one in detail. Presence In art and in life we’re thinking about the next big thing. A Photo-a-Day goal makes you think about right now. Looking for something meaningful, interesting, or even funny to photograph every single day helps to slow down time. Mindfulness gives you heightened awareness of your surroundings and you start seeing the photogenic in everything. Over time, your eye gets better and more discerning which allows you to walk away from every situation with more winning shots than duds. Your everyday environment may look very different to you at the end of the year than it does today. Practice The daily discipline...
Have All Your Holiday Pictures Become The Same? Try Telling A Photo Story

Have All Your Holiday Pictures Become The Same? Try Telling A Photo Story

The holiday season is in full swing and for many of us it is a time to spend with friends and family, some of whom we may not get to see often. Is it great to have that group shot of long lost friends or 3 generations of family in one frame? YES! But why not test your skills this year at telling a photographic story. Follow these simple steps to communicate just how beautiful, exciting, or sentimental your time was spent over the holidays. Doing so just might jog those memories ever more clearly in the years to come and leave you with something to always cherish. The Checklist A good way to start is by considering what your story or angle will be before you even pick up a camera. Plan ahead the shots which will be most critical, whether they are portraits or wide angle landscapes, that best tell your story. Having a loosely memorized shot list will increase your chances of capturing those key moments as they arise, since there will be many distractions while you shoot. Follow the Same Rules as Writing Whether you are blogging, sharing on social media, making a scrapbook, or submitting for publication your viewers will need to understand the context of your pictures. As you shoot, remember the who, what, when, where, and why. Your goal is to explain to viewers the reasons for your subject’s actions. Variety is the Spice of Life To tell a bigger more compelling story, shoot the subject or event from a range of viewpoints. Understanding beforehand how you would like your photographs to be read...
7 Tips You’ll Want to Know Before Gorilla or Chimpanzee Trekking

7 Tips You’ll Want to Know Before Gorilla or Chimpanzee Trekking

  For those of you who have seen Gorillas in the Mist, in Uganda the vision of sweeping mountains and dense jungle masked in a coat of soft mist is very real. The indigenous people have aptly named the gorilla’s home the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest. Impenetrable is, at times, an understatement. If you have ever photographed in rainforests or jungles, you have undoubtedly encountered moisture problems. The majority of fellow wildlife photographers know too well about the annoying spot of condensation that appears deep inside the confines of a lens right as the lens cap is removed, often happening at the most inopportune times. One way to deter moisture is to avoid removing your lens from your camera body and leaving it out of your pack as much as possible in the open air. Utilizing one lens may be difficult for those who travel with one body, so bringing along a back up lens is strongly suggested. If this isn’t possible, try putting on an 80-200mm lens and leaving it on until your trek is complete. If you encounter lens condensation while in the field, place your lens in a warm, dry place or in direct sunlight until the moisture clears. No. 2:  Wear Comfortable Hiking Boots and Gaiters One of the most important tips is to bring along ankle-high hiking boots and knee-high gaiters to wear during your trek. On your way to find the gorillas or chimpanzees, you will traverse up steep inclines and scale down slippery slopes for hours – often cutting your way through dense jungle by machete. There is a lot of life in the...