4th of July Shooting Tips for Beginners

4th of July Shooting Tips for Beginners

For most photo enthusiasts, 4th of July is more than a holiday – it is a day to practice some challenging shooting situations beyond just capturing fireworks. Here are 5 tips/shooting ideas for beginners (and reminders for seasoned shooters) that will help advance your skills over 4th of July. 4th of July Shooting Tips for Beginners 1. Show Parade Action with Slow Shutter Speeds 2. Light Write with Sparklers 3. Take Advantage of Selective Focusing 4. Shoot into the Sun 5. Capture Context During a Fireworks Show Show Parade Action with Slow Shutter Speeds Our instinct is to freeze moving objects but then they look stationary and the image feels flat as a result. Many parade photos end up looking boring for this reason. Practice slowing down your shutter speed to something longer than 1/100th of a second (experiment). If you’re out in the bright sun, you will need to increase your aperture to compensate and prevent extreme overexposure. See this section of our sports post for more details on panning settings. Light Write with Sparklers This is a fun activity that is explained in full in this post and this post but here are the quick basics for light writing: • Put your camera on a tripod. • Put your camera in “bulb” mode. This will keep the shutter open for as long as you want. If you do not have bulb mode, start with an exposure that is 30 seconds long (available on most cameras, including point and shoots). Below is an example of the bulb mode setting on a DSLR body and a mirrorless body. • Put your lens...
Ivan Makarov on Being a Dad and a Photographer

Ivan Makarov on Being a Dad and a Photographer

Being the family photographer is both a blessing and a curse – you’re afforded the rare opportunity to constantly preserve memories while also trying to balance that with experiencing them first-hand. Ivan Makarov understands this well. As a father of four, Makarov has been documenting his children’s lives since the moments they were born: “I shoot them wherever they are, doing whatever they’d like to do. My end goal is to document their childhood, as it starts and as they turn into teenagers and then adults.” In celebration of Father’s Day, we’re sharing some of our favorite family images from Makarov’s collection and providing 5 of his dad photographer tips that fellow shooters of all backgrounds can appreciate. Makarov’s 5 Tips: Tip #1: In a rut? Try switching to a new camera system. These days I shoot with Leica M and mostly with 35mm and 50mm lenses. I was a Nikon guy ever since I started in photography almost 10 years ago but I made the transition to rangefinder photography a couple of years ago when I was feeling stuck and uninspired with the process and with what I was producing. Leica gave me a new method of shooting because it’s quite different to shoot with the rangefinder and it also reignited my creativity to a point where I now can’t stop shooting! It’s been this way ever since I got the Leica. The original idea was to get a smaller camera that I can carry with me alongside my kids. It had a very surprising and positive effect on my creativity. I don’t think it matters all too much...
Your Gear Guide for Better Wedding Photography

Your Gear Guide for Better Wedding Photography

Find your perfect match in time for your next (or first) big wedding shoot. Many of you are probably worried about not bringing the right equipment with you. We have thousands of items for you to rent but only certain items are ideal for weddings. This list will help you narrow it down to just the essentials to fit your shooting style. Take note of these 10 tips that will help you complete your skills.

Planning for Safari: Photography Tips and Tricks

Planning for Safari: Photography Tips and Tricks

It’s safe to say that an African safari is on most wildlife photographers’ destination wish list. It is a trip many will never get the chance to do due to the extensive travel and time requirements as well as the significant financial expense. However, for those lucky enough to set out on the incredible journey it’s not as simple as picking a destination, hotel, and plane ticket. There is a significant amount of preparation and planning that must be done ahead of time.

Photography Tips: Getting the Perfect Ski Shot

Photography Tips: Getting the Perfect Ski Shot

Ian Coble is a commercial sports photographer based in Seattle, WA. His imagery and style have been used in campaigns for Patagonia, Columbia, Atlas Snowshoes, Brooks Running, Smith Optics, Cascade Designs, Red Bull and many others. Below he shares his tips for getting the perfect snow sports shot. Photography Tips: Getting the Perfect Ski Shot by Ian Coble Taking photos on your adventures can be incredibly rewarding but it can also be incredibly frustrating. You spend all day shooting your friends on an amazing outing and come home eager to look at your work. But as you review your images you find that they’re blurry, underexposed, or just plain boring—definitely not the way that you remember the excitement of the day. This tutorial will help you minimize those frustrations with some tech tips to follow the next time you take your camera on a ski or snowboard outing. Continue on for some expert advice just in time for the spring skiing season (and an unexpected dump in Tahoe)! Communicate Your Plan The number one piece of advice I can offer is to plan your shots and communicate that plan to whomever you’re shooting. Just having someone ski down past you while you snap photos is a quick way to guarantee sub-par shots. Talk to your subject before you have them ski down. Tell them what you’re looking for and your chances of getting a shot will drastically go up. Granted, this takes more time and some subjects may get frustrated by the delays. But if you’re after amazing photos, it’s absolutely required. I’ve never had an athlete complain about the...
Are You Afraid Of The Dark? Tips To Shoot Your Best Concert Yet!

Are You Afraid Of The Dark? Tips To Shoot Your Best Concert Yet!

Many photographers merge into a great photographic passion first by their inspirations of concert and band photography. Musicians and photographers are like cousins; we are enthused by the instruments we use, constantly searching for ways to make our mark, and feed off one another’s talent to express emotion. If you are among those who aspire to shoot concerts you may know already that the task is one of the most challenging in the industry, especially for beginners learning their craft. If you have interest in this fun yet competitive field and are just beginning or interested in improving – look no further! We have interviewed some of Borrowlenses.com‘s resident concert photographers for their tips and tricks including what equipment they recommend, how to get the best shot possible, and the leg work it takes to grant you access to get the optimal shot. Getting the Gig If you’re interested in getting started in concert photography, chances are you are already involved in some type of  music or performance scene. In the very beginning, asking friends to photograph them is a win win for both parties and gives you an immediate intimacy with your subject, thus propelling your new portfolio. There are definite challenges shooting in smaller, low lit venues. However, the greater likelihood of being allowed up close with little restrictions offers a playground to experiment with your camera settings. Once you have gotten your feet wet and ready for bigger gigs, NETWORK. Go crazy emailing PR firms, music labels, the bands, managers and management companies, and venues. Creating relationships within this sector of the music industry can afford you press...