High Dynamic Range vs Multiple Exposure Blending Editing for Photographers

High Dynamic Range vs Multiple Exposure Blending Editing for Photographers

Have you ever noticed when photographing a sunrise or a sunset that your DSLR camera can’t capture the brightest and darkest part of the scene at the same time in one exposure? This limitation is because of a camera’s dynamic range, or the gap in luminosity between the lightest and darkest parts of an image. Discover the three main techniques to overcome this and create dynamic landscape scenes.

Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive

Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Creative Suite Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His latest article guides novice Lightroom users and those confused when linking a Lightroom library with  an updated hard drive configuration. Continue on if you have ever experienced those perplexing question marks when attempting to work with a previously imported file within Lightroom. Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive by Seán Duggan One sure thing about digital photography is that, like the universe, your image library and the amount of hard drive space it requires is always expanding. And, if you’ve upgraded to a camera with more megapixels, it may be expanding faster than you originally thought it would! As your image archive grows you’ll eventually run out of space on your current hard drive or drives and you’ll need to move the files onto newer and larger capacity storage media. In this short episode of the Lightroom Viewfinder, I will show you how to move your Lightroom image library onto a new hard drive and then re-link everything to the Lightroom catalog file so you don’t run into those vexing question marks that appear when Lightroom can’t find the folder it’s looking for. [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRiEUNgN8kY] Seán Duggan is the co-author of Photoshop Masking & Composting, Real World Digital Photography, and The Creative Digital Darkroom. He is on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts in New York City and leads workshops all around the world. See all of Duggan’s Lightroom tips below: • Lightroom Keywording Tips • Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog • Adding Value to Your Image Archive with...
Lightroom Keywording Tips

Lightroom Keywording Tips

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Photoshop Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His Lightroom Viewfinder series provides photographers with the tools they need to effectively use Lightroom for organization, editing, and printing. Lightroom Keywording Tips by Seán Duggan Keywords are an important part of the organizational workflow for maintaining an image archive that is easy to work with, and one where photos can be found quickly. In an earlier article, I covered some basic keyword strategy and concepts for how you might use keywords to add more meaning to your images. In this article, we’ll concentrate on the procedural side of applying keywords with a look at some essential techniques for adding keywords in Lightroom. Apply Keywords on Import The first step in taking full advantage of keywords in Lightroom is to apply them as early in the workflow as possible In the Import dialog there is a place to add keywords in the Apply During Import section in the right panel. Location, event, or client names are all things that can be applied to all of the images on the card (assuming it contains a single shoot). Even if the card contains a mixture of images, you might be able to apply a couple of very general keywords (i.e. Europe, France, travel) that work for all the images on the card. Start Broad, then Narrow the Focus Once the images have been imported you can then apply more specific keywords. Let’s say you have a card full of images taken at several locations in California. The basic location...