5 Quick Tips for Shooting with the Atomos Shogun

5 Quick Tips for Shooting with the Atomos Shogun

We recently received the Atomos Shogun external monitor/recorder, a bit of gear a lot of customers have been eager to work with for some time now. We’re currently putting it through its paces and will have sample footage for you soon, but for now, we thought we’d put together a few tips and tricks that we’ve found useful when shooting with the Atomos Shogun. 1. Audio If you’ve got something like a Rode Videomic Pro plugged into your camera and intend to have the Shogun record the audio off that, you need to make sure the Shogun is set to do so. On the bottom-left corner of the Shogun’s screen is a small icon representing incoming audio (highlighted in red here). Tap that to bring it up, then make sure that the “Rec” button is a bright red next to the audio channel you want to record. If you’re not seeing any activity in your intended channel, check your camera; audio recording might be turned off. 2. Ensure clean HDMI output Cameras like the A7s can output not just the video signal to the Shogun, but also the on-screen menus – which will get recorded along with your intended footage. Make sure you turn those off!   3. Lock your screen Once you start recording, you can press the power button once on the shogun to lock the screen. This prevents any accidental touches from registering on the touch screen. You can also change a setting in the Shogun to power the screen down when you lock it, and save that use for in-between shots to save battery life. 4. Touch...
Industry Info: Our Favorite Infographics from 2014

Industry Info: Our Favorite Infographics from 2014

As resolutions begin to wane, now is a good time to look back at 2014 and glean some instructive trends in photography and videography from the past year. Here are some of our favorite infographics, charts, and general industry knowledge from 2014: DSLR & Digital Camera vs Smartphone Photography from Treat.com Phone shooting is on the rise and DSLR sales are sluggish – that’s not news – but the numbers are still interesting. Click the image to see the entire infographic from its original source. Camera ownership on Flickr: 2013-2014 This series of graphs shows brand popularity from last year. All we can say is…poor Pentax. Click graphic below for more. What Gear is Stolen Most and Where You’re Most Likely to Get Robbed from Lenstag.com (via PetaPixel) Shows exactly what the title says. Be careful on your next trip to Italy…click the graphic to see the rest. Here’s 2013’s, too. Occupational Employment and Wages from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Still waiting on 2014’s report but nothing has likely changed much from this 2013 report. See the entire report by clicking the graphic below. We Experiment On Human Beings! OkCupid’s Massive User Picture Data This is an excuse to list an old set of graphs from 2010 because they still prove to be strange and fascinating. OkCupid’s analysis of its users teaches all of us something (even if that something is shame). The Top 30 Most Socially Influential Photographers from eyefi This is probably the silliest collection of anything in the photography world from 2014 but, hey, BorrowLenses’ own Jim Goldstein made the list and it was way too...
The Sony FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS Lens is Ready for Your Next Video Shoot

The Sony FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS Lens is Ready for Your Next Video Shoot

We have a new cine lens for rent – the FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS. It’s ideal for both the Sony FS7 and the Sony a7S but will mount on any E mount camera. It is ideal for run-and-gun style shooting, documentary filmmaking, and any other cinematic use where portability is important. Here are some features that really stand out about this lens and why should you shoot with it. Focal Length: 28 – 135mm. Versatile range that prevents you from having to change lenses. Maximum Aperture: f/4. Fast enough for most low-light and out-of-focus needs. Designed for full frame Sony E mount cameras. Pair this with Sony’s a7 line. Compatible with crop sensor E Mount cameras. Pair this with the FS700, FS7, or any E mount camera. 1.31′ Minimum Focusing Distance. Relatively close range for a lens reaching up to 135mm. Auto Focus with Manual Focus Override. Fine-tune your focusing without using an AF/MF switch. Image Stabilization (Optical SteadyShot, or OSS). Allows you to gain more stops without sacrificing sharpness when shooting at lower shutter speeds. Super Sonic wave Motor. Silent autofocusing – essential for video. The FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS is light weight and partially manufactured with polycarbonate, making this lens more impact resistant and also better protected from the sun. It also helps save on weight. You can select between clicked and de-clicked aperture for ultimate control. Having a de-clicked aperture makes it great for run-and-gun shooting and adjusting exposure mid-take like when there is a major shift in exposure walking from indoor to outdoor lighting. This lens was designed side-by-side with the FS7, which boasts internal firmware to correct for aberrations, making this lens...
Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses

Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Photoshop Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His Jump Start series provides photographers with the informative ideas to effectively experiment with alternative photographic equipment. Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses by Seán Duggan On my recent Autumn & Aurora Discoveries workshop in Iceland, I decided to step outside my usual focal length comfort zone and do some experimenting with a 15mm fisheye lens on my full-frame Canon DSLR. BorrowLenses.com is a great resource that makes it easy to take different gear for a test drive and I really appreciate the large selection they have. Sometimes a lens is needed for a very specific purpose but at other times I’ll try out a lens simply because it offers such a different perspective from the lenses I normally use. This was the case with the 15mm f/2.8 lens. Most of my wide-angle shots are made at the 24mm focal length, with occasional images made with a 16–35mm. I knew, however, that the 15mm would offer a much different perspective than the 16mm. It is technically only one millimeter of focal length difference but the level of distortion is significantly more with the 15mm lens. Although the super wide angle-of-view was quite useful for some shots, it was actually the distortion that I was most interested in. Shooting straight at the horizon yielded an image that was very wide with not too much distortion but tilting the camera either up or down yielded a very pronounced curvature of the horizon. Tilting up...
What do Meditation and Macro Photography Have in Common?

What do Meditation and Macro Photography Have in Common?

Macro photography is much like a meditation practice: there must be a willingness to experiment outside your comfort zone, practiced patience, and a dedication to learning. The genre has been a popular niche for decades and now with easier accessibility to the tools it takes to create this kind of photo, there are a few ideas it is best to understand first. With its popularity there is a lot of technical information available that can be difficult to understand when you are first starting out. Whether you are shooting detailed still lives or capturing your environment in a new perspective, there are certain things to consider that will aid in your success and help you avoid defeating frustration. Understanding the most important questions to ask yourself and why its important to know the answers before you even pick up your camera is the first step. Let’s take a closer look at the best tools of the trade, tips, and tricks to get started in macro photography. What Exactly Is Macro Photography? Macro photography has been in pop vernacular for some time now and is the close-up photography of very small subjects captured life size. You will often hear the terms magnification rate or reproduction rates when referring macro photography, which translates the size in which the subject is being captured in relation to their actual size. A ratio of 1:1 is imagery true to life in size, 1:2 is half it’s size in reality, and so on. You can tell the ratio you are able to shoot by reading the markings on the side of a macro lens. For...
Filter Size Guide

Filter Size Guide

Filters are optional accessories that can either be screwed onto, dropped in front of, or dropped into lenses. They are usually made of glass with a metal or plastic frame. We put UV filters on almost all of our lenses going out on rental because even cheap filters help protect the front element during transport. Not keeping them on, or at least putting them back on when shipping back, can cost you! However, most people use filters for artistic reasons. They either want to restrict the amount of light coming into the lens, as in the case of neutral density filters, or they are trying to cut out glare with polarizing filters. There are strong UV filters that cut out visible light in the violet end of the spectrum (reducing haze) and there are graduated filters used to cut down exposure on only part of the frame – and many more! You can even stack them, though we kind of overdo it. Most of the time you’ll be encountering screw-on filters. Make sure you are renting the right size with the right-sized lens. Usually the front element of any lens will tell you its filter size (the lens cap is also telling) but here are some handy guides to help you find the correct pairing: Lens to Filter Chart – Canon with even more information here. Lens to Filter Chart – Nikon with even more information here. Lens to Filter Chart – Sony Lens to Filter Chat – Tamron Lens Chart (see Filter Size column) –...
Why the Sony RX100 III Point & Shoot is a Vacation Must-Have

Why the Sony RX100 III Point & Shoot is a Vacation Must-Have

Do you agonize over sacrificing quality in favor of comfort when packing camera gear for vacation? I tossed my hefty Nikon D800 aside and rented the Sony RX100 III from BorrowLenses.com for vacation. I wasn’t going to shoot much so if the camera sucked then no harm, no foul. The camera definitely didn’t suck. Sony’s third iteration of an already well-regarded model opened my eyes to just how far point and shoots have come. I didn’t expect to write this blog post so I don’t have very many traditional “camera review” photos. What I have, however, will demonstrate how one can get big results from a camera the size of a deck of cards. Part I: Sample Shots Night Photography They’re no National Geographic contenders but considering that I wasn’t expecting anything from laying my camera on the ground with a 15 second exposure, I am impressed. Being somewhere with very little light pollution (Rarotonga in this case) helps. The noise is bad in the clouds but I am really cranking it at ISO 5000. I didn’t spend time perfecting exposure times but I urge you to take this camera out and test its limits on night sky photography. Capturing average night scenes was fruitful as well. This is where we ate dinner every night. Taken handheld at 1/30th of a second, f/1.8 at ISO 800.The Macro Mode on the RX100 III is pretty good, too – even in low light! Macro Photography I didn’t play with this feature a whole lot but what I saw was promising. It’s no Olympus but that’s hardly a fair comparison. This is a point and...
Nikon D4s: Thoughts, Test Shots, and Quick Review

Nikon D4s: Thoughts, Test Shots, and Quick Review

Court Leve is a sports, wedding, portrait, and pet photographer. His work has been published in National Geographic Adventure, Powder, Ski, Skiing, Freeskier, Parade Magazine, ForbesLife Mountain Time, Spirit Magazine, Southwest Art, and more. He is a regular contributor to the BL Blog. Nikon D4s: Thoughts, Test Shots, and Quick Review by Court Leve Like most new iterations of Nikon’s pro bodies, the D4s is yet another leap forward in imaging. In my case, coming from a D3s to a D4s ,the improvements are quite noticeable. If you are a current D4 user, the differences will be more subtle but still noteworthy especially for those shooting video. It’s hard to believe a camera can make the D3s feel somewhat antiquated but the D4s does just that. While the D3s is more than capable for just about any situation, the D4s ups the ante yet again. The main areas of improvement are autofocus, low light capabilities, faster frames per second, and better handling. First is the handling of the camera. The added sub buttons are a welcome addition. The reach is shortened and response time quicker when selecting autofocus points.  The body has a few different tweaks and has a great solid feel. The new autofocus is simply amazing, extremely fast and accurate. While shooting a free skiing event I was capturing athletes coming towards me blind over a jump. I was able to instantly capture the skier in mid air while traveling towards me using my 80-400mm at 400mm and achieve nearly a 100% focus accuracy rate. Also helpful was the improved frame rate of 11fps and a nearly non-existent blackout time while...
The Elegant Simplicity of Building a MyPublisher Photo Album

The Elegant Simplicity of Building a MyPublisher Photo Album

For professionals and hobbyists alike, photo books are usually on our to-do list and get postponed because they’re often expensive, take time to build, and the quality is unpredictable. They are worth making because they can be awesome keepsakes or portfolios. There is something about the tactile experience of flipping through the pages of a real book. Swiping on an iPad just isn’t the same. I am on the hunt for a great photo book company. Here are my personal observations after trying out MyPublisher. The Elegant Simplicity of Building a MyPublisher Photo Book by Alex Huff Photo books often fall into two camps: kitschy scrapbook or modern minimalist. When tasked with a MyPublisher review, I was hesitant at first. I didn’t want to take the time to learn the ins and outs of building a good portfolio book and I also didn’t want to be limited to decorative “themes” for events I don’t have pictures for (think “baby shower” embellishments). I’m relieved to say that MyPublisher does it all, to one’s taste, and easily. Workflow: MyPublisher Book Maker To get started, you will need to download the MyPublisher Book Maker for either PC and Mac. Here is my quick takeaway on using it: The Pros: Drag and drop functionality. Integrates with your local files and folders (and, in their recent update, with your Facebook account if you opt for it). “Check Price” button to make sure you aren’t going over your personal budget (I LOVE this). Ability to share your finished project with others for review. Small program that doesn’t take up a lot of space (around 32MB)....