Imaging New Camera Winner + Upcoming Shows & Prizes

Imaging New Camera Winner + Upcoming Shows & Prizes

We’re giving away a ton of brand new gear this year. Be sure to visit our booth at WPPI this year to win cameras (like a 5D Mark III or a Sony a7S II), plus other great prizes. Thousands visited us in our booth at Imaging USA this year in Atlanta, Georgia. They got some free gifts and discounts but only 1 gets to win the grand prize of a Fuji X-A2 Mirrorless Camera with 16-50mm Lens!

Drumroll for the Winners at Photo Plus Expo

Drumroll for the Winners at Photo Plus Expo

Big thanks to everyone who stopped by our booth at Photo Plus Expo in NYC! Expo attendees got special access to some of the latest camera gear on display in booth #1105. They also received a special coupon code worth 10%, 20%, or even 50% off a future rental (randomly selected) plus were entered to win the new GoPro HERO4 Session and gift certificates to BorrowLenses.com!

Kino Flo Celeb 200 DMX LED Lighting Kit

Kino Flo Celeb 200 DMX LED Lighting Kit

One of the newest lighting rigs we have here at BorrowLenses is the Celeb 200 LED from Kino Flo. The Celeb features 100 watts of lustrous, soft white light, which can be programmed to display a range between 2700K to 5500K, without changing the light output.

Adobe CS6 and Lightroom 4 bogging down your computer?

If you’re a photographer, chances are that you spend a lot of computer time ploughing through the Adobe Creative Suite and Lightroom. Chances also are that you’ve also spent a fair amount of time tearing at your hair as you wait for that filter, or that export, or some other function to wrap up. What you may not know is that it might not be Photoshop or Lightroom that’s slowing your computer up. Here are a few tricks to help speed things up for you. 1. Close those browser windows and tabs. Do you really need to be checking your Facebook and Twitter feeds while editing photos and videos? Didn’t think so! We have all fallen victim to the Social Media gods, but a little resistance from a “hashtag” here and a “like” there will help you focus on whats important: color splashing and adding a vignette to all your photos! You probably never noticed, but multi-tabbed browser windows eat up a lot of system memory. The photo above is a screenshot of my computers activity. More than 1GB allocated to internet browsing! If your computer is running 8GB of ram or less, then you should close those tabs and allocate as much memory to your editing software as much as possible. 2. Add more Ram. This is probably the cheapest and single most efficient way to speed up your computer. You’ll not only see a significant decrease in render time, but you’ll see the overall performance of your computer get a boost. If you own an i7 MacBook Pro or a PC equivalent, you should be able add up...

Canon 5DMarkIII Review by OliviaTech.com

We spent a day with OliviaTech testing out the capabilities of the new Canon 5DMarkIII. We took it into a full production setting to shoot a music video and then into her studio to compare the ISO sensitivity, rolling shutter, and aliasing vs its predecessor, the Canon 5DMarkII. Check out the video review below and her full write up here. Longer video clips available for you to download at Canon 5D Mark II vs Canon 5D Mark III Video...

Travel Photography Tips from John Batdorff

This is a guest-post from John Batdorff II, a renowned travel photographer and friend of BorrowLenses.com. John is known for his landscape and travel photography, workshops, books and popular photography blog. He has traveled all around the world and, as part of our Tip of the Week series, shares his top tips on what to do if you’re planning a photo trip abroad. Take it away John!  Over the years I’ve learned a few things about travel photography. First and foremost, preparation is critical, and second, nothing ever goes as planned. Managing expectations, mitigating potential problems, and being flexible are key ingredients to ensuring a great experience. Here are few of my tips for planning a successful photo trip: Create a Shot List:  Whenever I’m traveling to an unfamiliar area I like to create a shot list of images I would like to capture. I’ll spend countless hours searching Google images and Flickr in an effort to familiarize myself with an area while jotting down places of interest. A good shot list should help answer questions like, what equipment will you need? Will you need a long lens, wide angle, tripod, backpack, etc? The list should help create opportunities by identifying the best locations and times to shoot, and most importantly, by feeding your creative vision. I like to think of my shot list as a fluid document that adapts and changes as opportunities present themselves. Buy a Good Book: A picture is worth a thousand words, but a good book about local culture and history is priceless. Understanding the people and places you are shooting will help you...
One Fisheye to Rule Them All!

One Fisheye to Rule Them All!

After spending some quality time with Canon’s newest L-series lens, the EF 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye USM, we can safely say it is the undisputed king of the fishes. It’s so versatile that it replaces at least five other lenses: the Sigma 8mm, Peleng’s 8mm, Tokina’s 10-17mm, Canon’s own 15mm and the Zenitar 16mm. It covers the same focal length as all five of these lenses (for the most part) while being sharper across the zoom range, delivering crisp, contrasty images that are to be expected from a lens bearing Canon’s lofty “L” designation. With this lens in your bag, there’s little reason to consider another fisheye lens, regardless of what camera body you are using. Full-Frame and Crop Sensor Bodies If you’re shooting with a full-frame camera like the 5D Mark II, the 8-15mm provides a full circular 180-degree half-hemispherical perspective (see below for examples). If you’re on a crop sensor, you will not get the full-circle effect as it’s simply not wide enough, and at the long end you’ll be at the equivalent of 24mm. This leaves a bit of breathing room for the Sigma 4.5mm which produces full circular images on the crop cameras (the only current fisheye it doesn’t totally replace).    What is a Fisheye? The fisheye look is characterized by barrel distortion, especially strong on the edges, that renders straight lines as curves unless they pass through the center of the frame. In some cases the distortion is distracting so many photographers opt to use an ultra-wide rectilinear lens (which lacks the fisheye curvature) such as the Canon 16-35mm or 10-22mm in order to produce a...