Featured Photographer Guy Tal

Featured Photographer Guy Tal

Technique, knowledge, inspiration – gain it all from seasoned photographers with years of experience and many tips to share with both burgeoning photographers and pros looking to gain a new perspective. Visit our entire collection of interviews, which are full of amazing images and valuable advice. Guy Tal is a professional artist, author, photographer, educator and public speaker. He believes that the practice of creative pursuits manifests not only in the making of art, but also has the ability to transform and enrich life, facilitate meaningful and rewarding experiences, and foster contentment and satisfaction through life-long discovery and learning. His work has been featured in Outdoor Photographer, Popular Photography, and Digital Photographer magazines, among many others. BL: What is your photographic specialty and how did you become interested in it? Tal: My goal is to create images that are personally significant and that communicate something of the state of mind and relationship with the subject that inspired them. In a sense, what I’m after is a more nuanced version of what Alfred Stieglitz called “equivalence,” as in implying something equivalent to the photographer’s experience in all its dimensions, both visual and emotional. In my mind, the best images are not images OF things; they are images ABOUT things. My favorite subject matter is the landscape of my home, the Colorado Plateau. I first became interested in these places as a young soldier, thousands of miles and a lifetime away, on the Golan Heights. By coincidence, or perhaps not, I found a copy of Edward Abbey’s “Desert Solitaire” and became fascinated with his descriptions. At the time I couldn’t even hope to see...
Three Key Methods For Backing Up Your Photographs

Three Key Methods For Backing Up Your Photographs

Zach Egolf is an IT professional and freelance photographer in the Baltimore area. In this guest post, he explains three methods for backing up your files in preparation for the worst possible scenario. The Importance of Back…Back…Backing Up reprinted with permission by Zach Egolf Wandering into the world of photography without a backup plan is a lot like wandering into…well, just about anything blindfolded!  You might think you know the terrain, how to navigate it, and where you’re going, but the next thing you know you’ve wandered into a forest, caught yourself on some thorn bushes, and lost your pants.  And much like losing your pants in an evil forest, losing your photos can be a frightening ordeal. Think of this scenario: You spend 10 hours shooting the perfect wedding.  The colors are all perfect, the lighting is spot-on, the bride and groom photograph like the two greatest love birds in the world.  You get home to your computer, pull all of the photos off of your memory cards, and then go to bed.  A wedding is a long day, after all, and you want to get your rest so that you can wake up the next morning and start working your magic! The next day comes along and you start to edit the photos.  Two days pass, you’re halfway through the photos and, all of a sudden, a freak storm rolls through town and zaps your house, frying your external hard drives, and wiping out 10 hours worth of photos.  You have nothing to deliver to your clients except the crisp shell of metal and magnets.  You have...
SnapKnot’s Favorite Beach Wedding & Engagement Photos

SnapKnot’s Favorite Beach Wedding & Engagement Photos

Photographers are always seeking ways to land that one awesome wedding shot. The unique setting, timing, and location of each photo opportunity is what makes the final product so special. In order to share some brilliant inspiration, we had our friends at SnapKnot send five of their favorite beach wedding and engagement photos from their expert photographers. Better yet, they shared the secrets behind their incredible shots. SnapKnot’s Favorite Beach Wedding & Engagement Photos This portrait was taken at sunrise just after a short ceremony with a Canon 5D Mark II and a 24-70 f/2.8L. Only natural lighting was used for this at ISO 320, f/2.8, and 1/1000th of a second. This well-timed candid was taken in the late afternoon after a heavy rain with a Canon 5D and a 24-105mm f/4L using only available light. Taken at ISO 400, f/5.6, and 1/250th of a second. This trash-the-dress shot was taken early in the morning with a Canon 5D Mark III and 135mm f/2L. No flash was used; instead, King captured the moment by taking super quick, multiple shots. Taken at ISO 800, f/6.3, and 1/1000th of a second. This scenic portrait was taken at sunset with a Canon 1D Mark IV and a 16-35mm f/2.8. To light the scene, Joy used 2 Canon 580EX II flashes triggered in ETTL mode with remotes. Final settings: ISO 200, f/2.8, and 1/1600th of a second. White balance was manually set. To learn more about triggering flashes at high shutter speeds, see Syl Arena’s tutorial on using high speed sync with Canon flash. This romantic silhouette was taken at sunrise with a...
Focus on Composition: An Interview with Nature Photographer Ian Plant

Focus on Composition: An Interview with Nature Photographer Ian Plant

Ian Plant is a world-renowned professional nature photographer, writer, and adventurer who has been photographing the natural world for almost twenty years. Plant is a frequent contributor and blogger for Outdoor Photographer Magazine, a Contributing Editor to Popular Photography Magazine, and a monthly columnist for Landscape Photography Magazine. He is also is the photographer/author of several dozen print and electronic-format nature photography books and his work has appeared in a number of other books, calendars, magazines, and advertising campaigns worldwide.

Capture Emotion: An Interview with Wedding Photographer Andy Lim

Capture Emotion: An Interview with Wedding Photographer Andy Lim

Andy Lim got started in photography after leaving design college in 1992 and his work has since been published worldwide. Andy conducts SimpleSLR hands-on digital photography workshops from beginners to advanced levels. He also writes useful and practical digital photography tips on GoodPhotography.info. Andy Lim is an accomplished professional wedding photographer and his brand, Emotion in Pictures, attracts clients worldwide with his unique flavor of emotional wedding and portrait photography.

Small Cameras with Big Impact: Traveling Light without Compromising Quality

Small Cameras with Big Impact: Traveling Light without Compromising Quality

Don’t get us wrong – we LOVE our big cameras, especially those pro bodies with huge, high-quality glass. Lugging it around, however, is not so ideal – especially while on vacation or during situations where there just isn’t a lot of room to shoot. High-quality sensors are coming in smaller and smaller form factors, which is good news for globe-trekking photographers or for those who simply need to pack lightly. These small cameras are perfect for: Hiking to get that great sunrise/sunset shot from a high vantage. Inconspicuously taking candids out on the street. Using auto or fully-manual settings on a simplified system. Here are 5 recommended small cameras with incredible image quality: Sony RX1 & Sony RX1R These full frame cameras sport 24 MP sensors and fixed 35mm f/2.0 Carl Zeiss lenses. They shoot full HD 1080p video and have incredible low-light performance. The “R” version lacks an optical low-pass filter, which is ideal for catching extra detail in landscape shooting. The only bummer about these? You’re stuck with that lens. However, on the full frame sensor the 35mm is a great walking-around focal length and the all-metal Zeiss construction is top notch. Another great small-form-factor offering from Sony is their NEX series of mirrorless cameras (with some sample images here). Olympus E-P5 This retro-looking, handsomely-built micro four thirds camera does full HD 1080p video and shoots stills up to 9 FPS on its 16MP sensor. It is very slim and yet still accepts interchangeable lenses, like the fast 17mm f/1.8 M.ZUIKO. Many of our street photographers extol the virtues of this camera. Fuji X100s Another retro beauty, the X100s comes equipped with...
Get Striking Photography Tips and Inspiration from 10 Pro Photographers

Get Striking Photography Tips and Inspiration from 10 Pro Photographers

In a world saturated with images, we want our work to stand out. It takes a lot of time, practice, and–sometimes–a little luck to get striking photographs. Here are 10 examples of striking photos we love from photographers working in the field today. We hope the images inspire you and the tips and tricks help you improve your portfolio. Benjamin Von Wong: “Exploring the multiple exposure function on my Nikon D700 unlocked some creative potential never before explored in this fiery shot of pyrotechnician Andrey DAS.” See Von Wong’s full tutorial to find out how this striking image was achieved. Troy Paiva: “There are pops of purple-gelled strobe between each car and through the windshield–snooted red LED in the tail lights and onto the ground too. I also added a few seconds of natural LED on the right trunk-lid edge and bumper, the reflection carefully placed to balance the moonlit reflections on the left side of the trunk. This is a stack of two 4-minute exposures–focused on ∞ for 8-minute star trails, and a 2-minute exposure focused on the tail lights for increased depth-of-field.” See ‘Thunderbirds Are Go!’ and more striking light-painted work on Lost America. Julia Kuzmenko McKim: “I believe great photography starts with the photographer’s thorough understanding of the main principles of light behavior and the basics of visual arts such as composition, visual balance and color theory. Everything else is just regular tasks and problem solving at each photo shoot: getting great experienced models with flawless skin, the crew of highly skilled creative professionals and the equipment and accessories that will help the photographer to achieve the results he or she...