BorrowLenses.com on the Set of Wilfred

BorrowLenses.com on the Set of Wilfred

The FX television series “Wilfred”, starring Elijah Wood, needed to shoot new backing plates for their hit show. Cinematographers take plate shots of empty sets using the same lighting as the final scenes. These “plates” can be used later for special effects. Kurt Jones, Director of Photography, decided to use the new Nikon 28mm 1.8G lens. He needed 13 of them to mount onto 13 Nikon D800 bodies. Borrowlenses.com was able to supply the DP and his television series with the tools they needed. The show shot exterior shots of the character, Ryan’s, house on location in Venice, CA. They then filmed all of the interior shots at a full-sized house that was wrapped in Green Screen on a sound stage at FOX Studios in Los Angeles. The plates are shot of the surrounding neighborhood and composited into the Green Screen during the VFX part of Post Production. Day Plates and Night Plates were photographed over a full day of shooting for Kurt and his crew. Here are some behind-the-scenes photos of the equipment at work. Photos courtesy of Kurt Jones/FX. Season 3 of Wilfred will begin airing on June 20th. Kurt Jones’ work can be found on his site and on his Facebook...
Multiple Flash Firing with Nikon’s Advanced Wireless Lighting System Using Pop-up Flash

Multiple Flash Firing with Nikon’s Advanced Wireless Lighting System Using Pop-up Flash

Topics Covered: Setting Commander Mode for your Nikon camera and firing off-camera Speedlights using a pop-up flash. Assigning multiple flashes to groups A and B to control from your Nikon camera’s Commander Mode. Adjusting your flash channel, illumination pattern, and zoom position. Compatible Cameras and Flashes (including Canon and Sony): If you own or rent one of the following cameras, you may fire off-camera flash via Commander Mode using the pop-up flash on your camera: D600, D800/E, D700, D300/s, D200, D90, D80, D70s, D7100 and D7000. This system is compatible with the following Speedlights: SB-910, SB-900, SB-800, SB-700, SB-600, and SB-R200. No need for radio triggers or cables! Canon shooter? You can do this, too, with the following cameras using Canon’s Integrated Speedlite Transmitter system: 7D, 60D, Rebel T3i, Rebel T4i, Rebel T5i, and Rebel SL1. Canon’s system is compatible with the following Speedlites: 600EX-RT, 580EX II, 430 EX II, 320EX, and 270EX. We’ll have more on how to set this up on Canon’s system in a later post. Don’t want to wait? This page will get you started. For Sony users, the following DSLR cameras and flashes also have a built-in, pop-up flash wireless system: A58, A65, A77, A700 with the HVL-F60M, HVL-F58AM, HVL-F43AM, and HVL-F42AM. Adding Flashes to Your Scene I took the above portrait using a single SB-910 Speedlight inside a 28″ Westcott Apollo softbox. For variety, I decided to show a little bit more of the environment and add 2 more flashes to the mix to get the result below. When working in Nikon’s Advanced Wireless Lighting system, you can fire 2 groups of flashes...
One Strobe, One Trigger, One Camera, and a lot of Luck: Behind the Scenes with Von Wong Photography

One Strobe, One Trigger, One Camera, and a lot of Luck: Behind the Scenes with Von Wong Photography

Photographer Benjamin Von Wong set out to the Salton Sea with some dart rope and a crew of chance encounters who were excited to make the trek to help out with this dramatic shoot. Check out the spectacular results below! Luck, Fire, and a Failed Ecosystem by Von Wong Photography, reprinted with permission. Equipment Used Lighting Gear: Profoto B2 Acute PocketWizard Plus III Camera Gear: Sirui Tripod T2205X, sponsored by LOVINPIX Nikon D800E Nikon 24-70 f/2.8 To see more great behind-the-scenes images and some of the technical notes for this shoot, please visit the full Inspired by Fire post HERE. Special thanks to Von Wong Photography for sharing this experience with us! Benjamin Von Wong will be speaking and doing a demo at at Profusion in Toronto on June,...
Learning To Leave The Matrix – A Tip On DSLR Light Metering

Learning To Leave The Matrix – A Tip On DSLR Light Metering

With our dependence on LCD screens to give us immediate exposure feedback, knowing how to meter light is at risk of quickly become a fading skill. In this guest blog post you will learn how your DSLR meters light and what that means for your photography. This is a great intro for beginners as well as an easy reminder for the more seasoned shooter. Learning to Leave the Matrix by Jay Cassario, reprinted with permission. In photography, light is everything. Understanding how your camera reads light and determines correct exposure is the most important thing your camera does, yet it is also one of the most misunderstood. Your camera has different ways that it reads light by using an internal light meter and, depending on which metering mode you have your camera set on, it determines the correct exposure. For the most part, the metering mode is untouched and buried in the camera settings because, when you’re in the Matrix, life is good. Matrix is the default metering mode for all modern Nikon DSLR camera bodies (Evaluative Metering for Canon) and is often never changed. Actually, it’s recommended by many that you not change it because it works so well–but that’s not always the case. I’m going to explain a little bit about leaving the Matrix default mode and why you would want to such a crazy thing. First, I’m going to do a quick explanation about what metering is. Metering has everything to do with exposure and understanding how your DSLR meters will help you understand a little bit more about how your camera determines the correct exposure when taking a picture. All...
Transitioning from Point-and-Shoot to DSLR: Understanding Full Frame vs Crop Frame Sensors

Transitioning from Point-and-Shoot to DSLR: Understanding Full Frame vs Crop Frame Sensors

Upgrading from a point-and-shoot camera to a digital SLR camera can be daunting, especially when you start hearing people carry on about what kind of sensor to get and you have no idea what they are talking about! The following will help you understand sensor size and how it can be a factor in your photography. This information will better equip you with the knowledge you will need to successfully choose your next camera. What is a Sensor? Every digital camera, even your point-and-shoot, has a sensor inside of it. In the simplest of terms, all these sensors do is convert an optical image (light) into an electronic signal which can be read as digital information–an image you download and can see, edit, and share. Your point-and-shoots have tiny, little sensors inside of them and for the most part they do a good job of converting light into digital information you can use–a photograph! Some of you may have heard people carry on about the “size” of their camera’s sensors. The reason they care about this is because dynamic range and low-light sensitivity generally improves as the size of the sensor increases. Defining Crop Sensors and Full Frame Sensors A piece of 35mm film measures approximately 36 x 24mm in size, and that’s the size of the sensor in Full Frame cameras like the Nikon D4 and the Canon 5D Mark III. Full frame sensor cameras are among some of the most expensive DSLRs you can buy. However, you can buy a DSLR camera with small sensor and still experience much greater image quality than you can from your average point-and-shoot. Cameras like the Nikon D7100 and the Sony A77 have APS-C-sized...
Nikon D7100 – Cropped Sensor for Night Photography?

Nikon D7100 – Cropped Sensor for Night Photography?

Want to know how the Nikon D7100 stands up to the challenge of night photography? David Kingham is a landscape photographer who focuses on the night sky. Kingham put the Nikon D7100 to the test to find out if its cropped sensor is worth considering as a viable choice for night shooting, especially when compared to the similarly-priced Nikon D600. Nikon D7100 – Cropped Sensor for Night Photography? by David Kingham After my previous test The Best Nikon for Night Photography, I was bombarded with requests to test the new contender in the APS-C sensor arena–the Nikon D7100. The initial numbers from DXOMark looked very promising for a cropped sensor. Previous cropped sensor bodies do not fare well with the extremely high ISO’s needed for night photography. Set Up I needed a benchmark to compare the D7100 to so I choose the Nikon D600 as a comparison because it’s the closest, price wise, and is the next logical step up from the D7100. The D600 also fared extremely well against the other full frame bodies I previously tested. So I felt this was a fair test of APS-C vs. Full Frame sensors. For the test, I needed a fast, wide angle lens. For the D7100, I choose the Tokina 11-16 f/2.8, which is a stellar performer when shooting wide open. For the D600, I choose the Rokinon 24mm 1.4. I set both lens at f/2.8 to level the playing field and I set the Tokina to 16mm to match the equivalent focal length of the 24mm. Build The build of these cameras are nearly identical. The D7100 is a...
5 Features for Adobe Lightroom 5

5 Features for Adobe Lightroom 5

In this video tutorial, adventure photo journalist Jay Goodrich highlights a few of the features that he finds most useful in the upcoming update to Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. He also has an up coming Lightroom workshop in Seattle, September 14-15, 2013. More information here. 5 Features for Adobe Lightroom 5 by Jay Goodrich, reposted here with permission. This is Episode 3 of Goodrich’s In the Office series of photography tutorials. See more of Goodrich’s work here and stay tuned for more great videos from him here on our blog! To see Episode 2,...
The Lightroom-Photoshop Connection: Sending JPEG Files Back and Forth

The Lightroom-Photoshop Connection: Sending JPEG Files Back and Forth

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Photoshop Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His Lightroom Viewfinder series provides photographers with the tools they need to effectively use Lightroom for organization, editing, and printing.  The Lightroom-Photoshop Connection: Sending JPEG Files Back and Forth by Seán Duggan Seán Duggan is the co-author of Photoshop Masking & Composting, Real World Digital Photography, and The Creative Digital Darkroom. He is on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts in New York City and leads workshops all around the world. See all of Duggan’s Lightroom tips below: • Lightroom Keywording Tips • Adding Value to Your Image Archive with Keywords • Adobe Lightroom Tips for Beginners: Merging a Travel Catalog with your Main Catalog • Adobe Lightroom Tips for Beginners: The Island of Lost Files • The Lightroom-Photoshop Connection: Sending JPEG Files Back and Forth • The Lightroom-Photoshop Connection: Sending RAW Files Back and Forth...
Top 10 Recommendations to Kick Off Wedding Season Right

Top 10 Recommendations to Kick Off Wedding Season Right

Wedding season is nearly upon us and in honor of this wonderful, yet sometimes stressful time, we have asked our friends at SnapKnot to share some of their wedding photography wisdom and what couples should be thinking about when choosing a photographer. Planning a wedding may not be easy but their community of expert wedding photographers will help make planning a piece of cake! SnapKnot’s 10 Recommendations to Kick Off Wedding Season Right: Tried and True Methods from their Experienced Photographers 1. Choose a wedding photographer you get along with. “This might sound strange, but look for someone that meshes with your personality. When a client and I share much of the same personality and interests, the wedding day goes that much smoother because it becomes a much more intimate affair rather than just a business transaction. Meeting in person, or even just on Skype, is a great way to get a feel for the photographer. If the meeting is awkward and forced, you can bet it will be that way on your wedding day and the same is true for if you feel comfortable during the meeting.” –  Daniel Aaron Sprague “Don’t just look at price and pictures. Be sure that your photographer’s personality and ways of interacting will mesh with yours and with your bridal party and family. Remember, this is a person who is going to be following you around for 8+ hours on your wedding day. He or she will see you in your underwear (or less). Make sure it is a personality that you will not get weary of a couple hours in.” – Deborah Hurd Photography 2. Know...
The Best Lenses for Night Photography: A Case for Rokinon Primes

The Best Lenses for Night Photography: A Case for Rokinon Primes

David Kingham is a landscape photographer who focuses (pun intended?) on the night sky. He set out to find the best astrophotography and night photography lenses for their price point. Discover why Rokinon lenses may transform how you shoot. The Best Lenses for Night Photography by David Kingham Prime vs Zoom What do you want in a lens for night photography? The most important factor is how much light a lens will let in so that we can shoot at lower ISOs– this means apertures of f/2.8 or greater (f/1.4 being preferred). Most zoom lenses only go to f/2.8 and, while they are perfectly okay for night photography, they are not the ultimate lenses to use. Enter the prime lens! A prime lens is a fixed-focal-length lens that is designed to have much larger apertures. If you have looked into the major manufacturers’ primes (Nikon, Canon, Zeiss) you may be thinking I’m crazy right now because they are expensive (unless, of course, you rent them)! I went on a search for lenses with the ultimate quality-to-price ratio. Rokinon Lenses In this search I’ve become a huge fan of Rokinon brand lenses. These are also branded under Samyang, ProOptic, and Bower. They are all the same lenses, just with different names. Rokinon seems to be the more common name in the US. The following lenses are relatively cheap compared to the pro-series Nikon or Canon lenses: Rokinon 14mm 2.8 (also available in Canon mount) Rokinon 24mm 1.4 (also available in Canon mount) Rokinon 35mm 1.4 (also available in Canon mount) Rokinon 85mm 1.4 BorrowLenses.com has the following Canon cinema lenses available to...