BTS: World Championship of Beach Ultimate Frisbee

BTS: World Championship of Beach Ultimate Frisbee

I am a sports photographer and was hired by Ultiphotos as a member of a team of photographers to shoot the 2015 World Championships of Beach Ultimate Frisbee (WCBU) in Dubai. With only four official photographers we held quite a bit of responsibility on our shoulders as we were contracted to document 1100 players of 71 teams representing 25 countries during 380 games on 10 fields in only 6 days of non-stop sports photography! Learn how I came to grips with this seemingly overwhelming task and kicked my photo endurance into overdrive.   The playing field was about 80 yards long from back-endzone to back-endzone. Ninety percent of the time I opted for the Canon 300mm f/2.8 and Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 on 2 Canon 1DX bodies. With both cameras attached to the new Custom SLR Dual Camera Strap it was quick and easy to switch between setups as the action got closer or further away.     Since I’m traveling long distances, I didn’t bring any longer glass such as the Canon 200-400mm with 1.4x extender or 400mm f/2.8 (another alternative would be the 400mm f/5.6). Otherwise I would have also put a monopod to good use!     I also carried with me in a Think Tank belt system, a Canon 24-70mm II f2.8, Canon 16-35mm II 2.8, and a Canon 15mm 2.8 fisheye. This robust shooting kit allowed me to capture action coming right at me from my favorite spots in the endzones, as well as roam the sidelines to catch intimate moments close to the players.     As I previously alluded, my favorite place to shoot field...
What (Else) to Know When Renting the Hasselblad H4X Medium Format Camera w/ 80MP IQ280 Digital Back

What (Else) to Know When Renting the Hasselblad H4X Medium Format Camera w/ 80MP IQ280 Digital Back

A while back, we did a piece on what to know when renting Hasselblad H4X Medium Format Camera w/ 80MP IQ280 Digital Back. Medium format gear is a pretty different creature from your standard DSLR, even your high-end Canon 1Dx and Nikon D4’s. Like my colleague Alex Huff pointed out, it can be “perhaps a little scary.” Here are a few more things you should keep in mind when shooting with the Medium Format gear, especially with the 80MP IQ280 Phase One back. As Alex mentioned, you will need Capture One to read and work with Phase One’s IQF files. While Capture One is available for free for 60 days, here’s something even better – it’s available for free for an unlimited amount of time in “DB” mode. DB mode restricts you to using Capture One with files from Phase, Mamiya, and Leaf digital backs only, but has the full feature set of Capture One Pro. Alex also mentioned the reverse crop-factor for lenses when you use them with this back. That difference is ridiculously stark when compared to APS-C or even full-frame sensors, let alone Micro 4/3 or smaller. Here’s a shot taken with a 24mm lens. As an image, it’s not particularly remarkable – till you realize that I was standing almost under the tree itself. The reverse crop factor gives you some seriously wide angles. The lenses made by Hasselblad are amazing as far as image quality goes. What they are not, is weather-sealed. I can’t stress this enough, folks – do NOT take these out to Burning Man. Or the beach. I did, and we had...
The Best Lenses for Night Photography: A Case for Rokinon Primes

The Best Lenses for Night Photography: A Case for Rokinon Primes

David Kingham is a landscape photographer who focuses (pun intended?) on the night sky. He set out to find the best astrophotography and night photography lenses for their price point. Discover why Rokinon lenses may transform how you shoot. The Best Lenses for Night Photography by David Kingham Prime vs Zoom What do you want in a lens for night photography? The most important factor is how much light a lens will let in so that we can shoot at lower ISOs– this means apertures of f/2.8 or greater (f/1.4 being preferred). Most zoom lenses only go to f/2.8 and, while they are perfectly okay for night photography, they are not the ultimate lenses to use. Enter the prime lens! A prime lens is a fixed-focal-length lens that is designed to have much larger apertures. If you have looked into the major manufacturers’ primes (Nikon, Canon, Zeiss) you may be thinking I’m crazy right now because they are expensive (unless, of course, you rent them)! I went on a search for lenses with the ultimate quality-to-price ratio. Rokinon Lenses In this search I’ve become a huge fan of Rokinon brand lenses. These are also branded under Samyang, ProOptic, and Bower. They are all the same lenses, just with different names. Rokinon seems to be the more common name in the US. The following lenses are relatively cheap compared to the pro-series Nikon or Canon lenses: Rokinon 14mm 2.8 (also available in Canon mount) Rokinon 24mm 1.4 (also available in Canon mount) Rokinon 35mm 1.4 (also available in Canon mount) Rokinon 85mm 1.4 BorrowLenses.com has the following Canon cinema lenses available to...
Top Ten Tips for Amazing Amusement Park Photography

Top Ten Tips for Amazing Amusement Park Photography

Kristopher Rowberry is the creator and host of Great American Thrills and an anchor at 1590 KLIV: Silicon Valley News. He is an extreme theme and amusement park enthusiast and knows the ins and out of taking photographs at one of America’s favorite attractions. If you’re heading to an amusement park this summer with camera in tow, be sure to read this tips first! Top Ten Tips for Amusement Park Photography by Kristopher Rowberry There are few places on Earth that allow you to use the full feature set of your camera skills and most people don’t think that place would be the grand old American amusement park! I’m here to show you how to get spectacular shots, while having fun at the same time. My Favorite Arsenal: Nikon D800 Nikon 14-24mm Nikon 24-70mm Nikon 70-200mm VR II 3 circular polarizing filters Lowepro Flipside 300 Backpack For most of my action shots, I shoot at a high shutter speed to avoid blur in the daylight (about 1/4000th of a second and above) and adapt my ISO settings accordingly depending on sun or shade. TIP #1: If you intend on going on any rides or attractions, assume your gear isn’t coming on board with you. While you’re spinning around in the air, your gear is on the ground and vulnerable to theft. Take this into consideration when packing your backpack the night before. Consider using an “All Day Use” locker so you can secure your items and not worry about your equipment being stolen while on rides. The $5-$15 investment is well worth it.  TIP #2: Check the park press page...
Quick Tip on Blending Two Photos in Time Bracketing

Quick Tip on Blending Two Photos in Time Bracketing

Photographer Marc Muench took a compelling photo while out in Death Valley National Park. The sun is setting and it appears as if the night is rolling in at hyper speed, allowing the stars and clouds to shine through the still-bright sky. This image is, indeed, a composite but not so much a composite of completely different images–it is more of a composite of time. This simple technique is what Muench likes to call “Time Bracketing”. Capturing different exposures of the same scene and merging them together later is the basic concept behind High Dynamic Range photography. What makes Time Bracketing a little different is that it is allowing the time of day, rather than just in-camera settings, to dictate the exposure and scene for blending later. This is how Muench was able to get bright stars in the same frame as a bright setting sun and it is a nice way to get a very unique look in a nature photo while still staying true to the environment of the scene you are capturing. Check out his behind-the-scenes video to see just how he got this shot: Time Bracketing Thanks goes out to Marc Muench for letting us share this tip with our audience! Just getting started in landscape photography? Take the guesswork out of what to rent and try one of BorrowLenses.com’s Landscape Essentials packages, in both Canon and...