In-Camera Time-Lapse Photography Resource and Guide

In-Camera Time-Lapse Photography Resource and Guide

Fast-disappearing are the days of having to have a separate interval timer to create time-lapses. Many cameras now have built-in intervalometers. The following is a guide to setting up the time-lapse function for most cameras. 1. What is a Time-Lapse? 2. What Gear Do I Need for a Time-Lapse? 3. Notable Cameras with Built-in Interval Timers 4. What Settings Do I Need for a Time-Lapse? 5. For How Long Should I Make My Time-Lapse? 6. Time-Lapse Instructions By Camera 7. How to Put Together Your Time-Lapse What is a Time-Lapse? Time-lapses are comprised of a bunch of pictures of the same thing taken over a long period of time. You then display them quickly in sequence when you’re done. The result is a little “movie” that displays a slow passage of time quickly. Time-lapses are a great way to show how a kid grows, how a flower dies, how stadiums fill up, how the weather changes, and even how the Earth rotates! Most of time, though, you just want to show something simple made interesting, like the sun setting rapidly or the bustle of traffic. Time-lapses also make good scene fillers for larger visual projects. Pay attention and you’ll start noticing them everywhere, from the credits of TV shows to commercials and music videos. What Gear Do I Need for a Time-Lapse? Before we get into interval sequencing, it is important to understand some basic fundamentals of time-lapse photography. Consistency is key. You will need the following: • A tripod or other very stable environment. • A lens with manual focus. • Distance from random light sources (for example, don’t turn your...
Hard at Work

Hard at Work

I’m working on a piece on tilt-shift lenses for our blog and I wanted to get some shots of the historic forts in the Marin Headlands at sunrise. So, I hauled my carcass out of bed at 4:30am and made it to the headlands shortly before sunrise. Turns out, it was one of those beautiful days where the upper reaches of Conzelman road, which overlooks the Golden Gate Bridge and downtown San Francisco, was right above the marine layer. So I pulled over to shoot a bit from there, and guess who I ran into? Our Marketing VP, Jim Goldstein, was out in force, shooting time-lapse videos with two bodies, a dolly, and other miscellaneous gear. This was my first time up there this early (I tend to shoot a lot in the evenings, when I don’t have to ingest large amounts of caffeine to keep my eyes open), and apparently, I had the luck of the beginner, as Jim said it could take as many as ten tries to get the atmospheric conditions we had that morning. Jim, for those of you who aren’t familiar with him, is a professional photographer himself (that’s kind of a running theme with BorrowLenses.com hires – we’re all either pro or avid amateur photographers). You can find out more about him on his blog, http://www.jmg-galleries.com/blog/, or you can follow him on Twitter (@jimgoldstein) or on Google+ at https://plus.google.com/+JimGoldstein/ Jim also has an excellent eBook out now called Inspired Exposure, which tackles an element of photography we often don’t think about as still shooters: time. From Light Painting and Star Trails photography to time-lapses and cinemagraphs, this...