Shooting On the Go With the Olympus OM-D

Shooting On the Go With the Olympus OM-D

Not too long ago, I switched to the Nikon D800E with a series of prime lenses for all of my primary photography. I love the Nikon, and it’s proved to be a fantastic system, capably handling just about everything I’ve thrown at it. The downside is that it is, truly, a system. A big, heavy system. I quickly found myself looking for a smaller, carry-around camera for some of my more photojournalistic endeavors, and immediately turned to the family of mirrorless cameras out there for an answer. Of these, there is no shortage. You have the awesome Sony NEX-6, which I’ve raved about in the past. There’s also the Sony RX-1, the Panasonic GF3C, the Fuji X-Pro1, and the subject of this article, the Olympus OM-D E-M5. I’ve had the Olympus OM-D E-M5 for the past few weeks now, and have been using it as my primary “take everywhere” camera. It’s small size, lens selection, and great image quality combine to provide a system that’s flat-out my favorite in this category. In this article, I’ll present my experience shooting with this little thing, rather than a full-on technical review. The Build This thing is solid and extremely well-built. I’ve got chubby little sausages for fingers, but I can still get a pretty decent grip on it, thanks to the tab on the back and the indent in the front that give your thumb and middle fingers a secure place to grasp onto. The buttons, though tiny, are pretty responsive, so it’s not hard to use many of them just by feel The back of the OM-D, shown above, is...
Tip of the Week: Our Top 5 Sites for Photographic Inspiration

Tip of the Week: Our Top 5 Sites for Photographic Inspiration

Every week, we post a photography-related tip on our blog. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. This week’s tip is about inspiration. One of the keys to becoming a better photographer is to look at the work of other photographers. Before the internet (and there are some of us who remember those dark and ancient times), this meant buying or borrowing heavy and expensive printed books. No more. Now, inspiration is at your fingertips. Here are the top 5 sites we go to (in no particular order) for inspiration when we’re in need of it. 500px.com: One thing to know about 500px is that if you sign up, put only your best work on it. Unlike other photo sharing websites, 500px is a haven for excellent photography. No one’s going to come and knock on your door with an angry scowl if you post pictures of your breakfast, but this site isn’t the place for that kind of thing. The team that runs 500px is made up of folks who live and breathe photography, and the community that posts there is just as passionate. Posted images are big by default and clicking on them brings them up even larger in a “lightbox” that sits atop the current page. Tablet and smartphone users will like the fact that the site is very mobile-friendly and there’s even a dedicated app for browsing images on the...