Canon 70D – Continuous Autofocus With STM Lenses

Canon 70D – Continuous Autofocus With STM Lenses

Have you ever tried to autofocus in Live View with a DSLR? Pretty crummy, right? The Canon 70D changes that a bit with what they call Dual Pixel CMOS AF. This fairly new technology allows smooth, continuous autofocus (Canon calls is Movie Servo AF) while recording video. Continue on to view the test footage recorded when paired with Canon’s STM lenses. You may also be wondering what STM stands for in all these newly released Canon lenses! It stands for STepping Motor and it is the newest technology developed by Canon to better enable smooth video capture. Lenses designed with STM technology produce super smooth continuous autofocus even while shooting video. In addition, STM lenses are silent, eliminating traditional AF noise that was known to creep into video. We took the 24-105mm STM lens out to gather some example footage to share with you. Overall the AF tracks pretty well and pulls smoothly. Combined with the 70D, the AF experience is much more camcorder-like than what is the norm shooting with DSLRs. So there you have it! An easy solution to shoot some basic video, especially if you are just breaking in and would like a good head start into the popular world of DSLR video production. Incidentally, you can also take advantage of the Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology in the new Canon 7D Mark ll. Let us know your feedback and how you enjoyed this setup or what you would recommend in the comments...
The Sony FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS Lens is Ready for Your Next Video Shoot

The Sony FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS Lens is Ready for Your Next Video Shoot

We have a new cine lens for rent – the FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS. It’s ideal for both the Sony FS7 and the Sony a7S but will mount on any E mount camera. It is ideal for run-and-gun style shooting, documentary filmmaking, and any other cinematic use where portability is important. Here are some features that really stand out about this lens and why should you shoot with it. Focal Length: 28 – 135mm. Versatile range that prevents you from having to change lenses. Maximum Aperture: f/4. Fast enough for most low-light and out-of-focus needs. Designed for full frame Sony E mount cameras. Pair this with Sony’s a7 line. Compatible with crop sensor E Mount cameras. Pair this with the FS700, FS7, or any E mount camera. 1.31′ Minimum Focusing Distance. Relatively close range for a lens reaching up to 135mm. Auto Focus with Manual Focus Override. Fine-tune your focusing without using an AF/MF switch. Image Stabilization (Optical SteadyShot, or OSS). Allows you to gain more stops without sacrificing sharpness when shooting at lower shutter speeds. Super Sonic wave Motor. Silent autofocusing – essential for video. The FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS is light weight and partially manufactured with polycarbonate, making this lens more impact resistant and also better protected from the sun. It also helps save on weight. You can select between clicked and de-clicked aperture for ultimate control. Having a de-clicked aperture makes it great for run-and-gun shooting and adjusting exposure mid-take like when there is a major shift in exposure walking from indoor to outdoor lighting. This lens was designed side-by-side with the FS7, which boasts internal firmware to correct for aberrations, making this lens...
Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses

Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Photoshop Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His Jump Start series provides photographers with the informative ideas to effectively experiment with alternative photographic equipment. Creative Jump Start: Shooting with Fisheye and Ultra Wide-Angle Lenses by Seán Duggan On my recent Autumn & Aurora Discoveries workshop in Iceland, I decided to step outside my usual focal length comfort zone and do some experimenting with a 15mm fisheye lens on my full-frame Canon DSLR. BorrowLenses.com is a great resource that makes it easy to take different gear for a test drive and I really appreciate the large selection they have. Sometimes a lens is needed for a very specific purpose but at other times I’ll try out a lens simply because it offers such a different perspective from the lenses I normally use. This was the case with the 15mm f/2.8 lens. Most of my wide-angle shots are made at the 24mm focal length, with occasional images made with a 16–35mm. I knew, however, that the 15mm would offer a much different perspective than the 16mm. It is technically only one millimeter of focal length difference but the level of distortion is significantly more with the 15mm lens. Although the super wide angle-of-view was quite useful for some shots, it was actually the distortion that I was most interested in. Shooting straight at the horizon yielded an image that was very wide with not too much distortion but tilting the camera either up or down yielded a very pronounced curvature of the horizon. Tilting up...
Reviewing the Sigma 15mm f/2.8 and Nikon 16mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lenses for Night Sky Landscape Photography

Reviewing the Sigma 15mm f/2.8 and Nikon 16mm f/2.8 Fisheye Lenses for Night Sky Landscape Photography

David Kingham is a lanscape photographer who focuses (pun intended?) on the night sky. He field-tested some of our fisheye lenses to see which one is most suitable for this kind of work. If you’re interested in astrophotography and landscapes, check out Kingham’s findings below (reprinted here with permission): Fisheye Lenses for Night Photography by David Kingham Sigma 15mm 2.8 vs Nikon 16mm 2.8 I’ve been looking to add a fisheye to my arsenal of night photography lenses, but I was never able to locate solid information on what the best lens is for my style of night photography, specifically. I knew I needed to do my own testing to know for sure. I received the Sigma 15mm 2.8 and Nikon 16mm 2.8 from BorrowLenses.com and I needed to go someplace spectacular to test them out–what better place than Canyonlands National Park? I first tested the Sigma and tried setting the focus manually to infinity and taking a shot only to be disappointed to see blurry stars on the LCD. I then used Live View to set my focus on a bright star and, even though the focus was set well before infinity, it was now razor sharp. Not ideal, but I have the same problem on my Rokinon lenses, so I can get used to this. I switched over to the Nikon, which feels solidly constructed compared to the Sigma and is smaller and lighter as well. Another positive about the Nikon is that it hard stops at infinity. This means no guessing on your focus–just spin it until it stops and you have no worries. Sounds like the Nikon is the clear...
Wide Without the Weird: Zeiss’ New Low-Distortion 15mm f/2.8 Distagon T* ZE for Canon

Wide Without the Weird: Zeiss’ New Low-Distortion 15mm f/2.8 Distagon T* ZE for Canon

Note: Just as this post went live, we got in the Nikon version of this same lens. It is available to rent here. Natural Proportions for Architecture The new Zeiss 15mm f/2.8 Distagon T* ZE for Canon is an ultrasharp, full frame lens that controls distortion much better than its other ultrawide peers. The natural proportions of this lens, despite its angle-of-view, lends itself well to architecture photographers. The relatively close focus of 0.25m (10”) also makes this lens a great option for those shooting in tight spaces, particularly party and wedding photographers. Finally a Filter for a 15! In comparison to similarly wide lenses, the consensus so far is that the Zeiss 15mm outperforms the best of them in terms of sharpness and distortion control. Another advantage of the Zeiss 15mm over the Canon 15mm Fisheye, the 8-15mm, or the 14mm is that this lens comes with a front threaded filter ring that accepts a 95mm filter. This, and the built-in metal hood, provide more protection for the bulbous glass that is natural for a lens of this focal length. The large front element makes this one of the largest wide angle primes we have in inventory. Full Frame and (almost) Full F-Stop While this lens is designed for full frame cameras, it can still be used on crop sensor cameras–your angle-of-view being the equivalent of a 24mm on a 1.6x crop camera, such as the Canon 60D or the 7D. At f/2.8, this lens is handy in lower light situations and stops all the way down to f/22. With a 9-blade diaphragm, the Zeiss 15mm produces smooth bokeh...