5 Things I Learned at the Google+ Photographer’s Conference

5 Things I Learned at the Google+ Photographer’s Conference

Last week we had a great time at the Google+ Photographer’s Conference. As an event partner and sponsor we had a chance to meet a lot of great photographers in attendance. The conference had a great energy to it. With photographers being so active and social on Google+ it was rather effortless to pick up conversations in person with photographers of all stripes and experience levels. It was for this reason alone that attending was an amazing experience. Beyond meeting with great photographers there was a lot of great information shared amongst attendees and speakers alike. The 5 takeaways that I came back with that all photographers on Google+ could stand to benefit from included: 1. Focus on Community The community on Google+ feels like the Flickr photography community of old. There is a constant flow of photos with many photographers you’ll find familiar and many more that will likely be new to you. It’s a great time to explore and network with photographers of all backgrounds, experience levels and expertises. In fact there are numerous sub-communities on Google+ focusing on various photography niches. Google+ makes it super easy and fast to find information in alignment with your photographic and non-photographic interests. What made the Google+ Photographer’s Conference so special is the fact that this virtual community became tangible. If you follow someone on Google+ it was all the reason you needed to introduce yourself. It was great to be able to pick up conversations previously confined to posts and comments. Getting out to talk and photograph with your compatriots from abroad made for an extremely special time. 2....
Tip of the Week – Replicate Photographer Peter Hurley’s Signature Look With Strobes

Tip of the Week – Replicate Photographer Peter Hurley’s Signature Look With Strobes

Every week, we post a photography-related tip on our blog. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. If you followed this blog for any length of time, you know that we’re big fans of headshot photographer Peter Hurley. Peter is extremely well-know for his ability to get fantastic shots for his subjects. His ability get a range of expressions through rigorous coaching is, I think, what makes his images stand out from the rest. His lighting setup is also a subject of much discussion. Peter uses Kino Flo lights, which produce a fantastic quality of light. If you’re interested in trying those out, BorrowLenses.com does rent them, though they are in very high demand at the moment. You don’t have to use Kino Flos, however. I wanted some portraits of fellow BorrowLenses.com staffer Alex Huff, so I decided to try and replicate Peter’s lighting style with strobes. Here’s a list of the gear you can use for this kind of shoot. Lights Modifiers Other 3 Einstein E640. Speedlight (Canon 580EXII or Nikon SB-910 will work). Generic strip boxes were used for this shoot; however, the following items would make for excellent substitutes. Profoto 4×6 softboxes for the vertical sources. Profoto 2×3 softbox for the overhead. Reflector for a bit of bounce underneath the model. A Sun-Bounce Micro Mini would do the trick perfectly. PocketWizard MiniTT1 on-camera. PocketWizard AC3 Zone Controller on-camera. PocketWizard PowerMC2 modules...

Yeah, We’re Fanboys…

Max, Jim and I are at Guy Kawasaki’s talk on branding in Google+, and we got a pleasant surprise. So, here’s a shot of Guy, with his computer’s display mirrored via projector. And here’s his screen, zoomed in. Yep, that’s us! and yeah, we’re fanboys. Guy was kind enough to mention us during his talk, and for those who missed it, Guy also visited out offices recently. Here’s another shot of Guy’s screen, showing him at BL’s office. If you’re at the Google+ Conference For Photographers, remember, we’re here too! Come find either Jim or Max (they’re walking around in BorrowLenses.com t-shirts) and say...
Tip of the Week: In-Camera Panos with Fuji

Tip of the Week: In-Camera Panos with Fuji

Making panoramic images is one of my favorite things to do, and I tend to go to some lengths to make them. My tool of choice is usually something along the lines of a Canon 45mm TS-E lens, and I use a technique I described in a previous Tip of the Week piece, “Use a Tilt-Shift Lens for Panoramic Photos.” That technique takes some time, thought, and setup, and I don’t always have time to do it right. Sometimes, I want to create a panoramic image quickly and easily. The usual thing to do, then, is to use a wide-angle lens and simply crop the center out. This is a good idea, but unless you’re using a 20+MP camera, you’re going to end up with something pretty small (on the order of something like a 3-4MP image). There’s a better option. I’ve been shooting with the Fuji X-Pro1 and the X100 for some time now, and both cameras have what they call a “Motion Panorama” setting. With a bit of practice, you can use this sweep panorama with great effectiveness. First, hit the “Drive” button on your Fuji camera. On the X-Pro1, this is a dedicated button, but is part of the 4-way rocker on the X100. Once you do so, scroll down to the “Motion Panorama” mode. Once you’re in the Motion Panorama mode, hit the “OK” button on the back of your Fuji. You will then see a screen that looks like the one in the image below. In our example, we left the lens cap on so that the guides on the screen stand out, but...

Product Update: D800 and D4 Lock-Up Fix

News has been circulating today about a newly identified bug with the Nikon D4 and D800 that may negatively impact photographers employing certain settings. To give you a deeper insight to the problem, a short term fix and a likely long term solution our resident technical expert and repair manager Michio Fukuda  has the following to report:   The Bug Nikon’s newly released D4’s and D800’s have had an alarming number of complaints regarding an intermittent issue causing the bodies to lock up under normal user conditions. Nikon has officially addressed the issue, in a recent conversation with PDN (Photo District News) on 5.3.2012,  and DPReview has since confirmed this bug.  The problem encountered again and again is that the body will become completely unresponsive until the battery is removed and re-installed, but should return to good working order once this is done.   The Fix Nikon stated that the issue is present for only a small users who have ‘Highlights’ and ‘RGB Histogram’ display options turned on.  They also communicated that they are in the process of developing the permanent fix and have instructed users on a temporary fix for the interim. The temporary “band-aid” fix is to turn off the ‘Highlights’ and ‘RGB Histogram’ display options in the ‘Playback Display Option’s sub-menu of  the ‘Playback’ menu.   Here is the step by step process to implement the temporary fix:   Step 1 – Press the menu button.   Step 2 – Scroll down to “Playback display options” and press the center button on the directional pad to access that menu.   Step 3 – Once inside the playback menu, scroll down to “highlights” and “RGB histogram”.   Step 4 – Deselect the “highlights” and “RGB...