Tip of the Week – Fast and Easy Model Releases with Top Model Release

Tip of the Week – Fast and Easy Model Releases with Top Model Release

Every week, we post a photography-related tip on our blog. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. Model releases are often the bane of photographers’ lives. We go through a great deal of effort to put a killer shoot together, then fail to get a model release, rendering the shoot unusable till we get one. Photographers have ended up losing court cases and jobs over missing releases or improper wording in releases, which is why it’s extremely important to get your releases in order right away. If you’re an iPhone or iPad user, there’s a new app that’s been getting a lot of buzz from pros like Scott Kelby and Scott Bourne. Created by photographer Catherine Hall, Top Model Release is an iPhone app that makes getting signed model releases from your subjects almost trivial. The app is very straightforward. On first launch, you fill out your own contact information, which the app stores. Once you do that, you’re taken straight to the main screen where you can chose from one of three model release types. There’s an Adult release, a Minor release for children that requires their guardian’s signature, and a Property release for when you’re shooting architecture, for example. From there, you then fill out the model’s information. I like that I can grab that info from the iPhone’s contacts database, and it fills in almost all the fields for me, save...
Photo Finds: Fashion Photographer Melissa Rodwell

Photo Finds: Fashion Photographer Melissa Rodwell

Welcome to Photo Finds, a feature where we point you to some of the best photography around the web. This week, we bring you the work of fashion photographer Melissa Rodwell. I’ve been following Melissa’s blog since 2010 when it first came to my attention through David Hobby’s Strobist blog. Since then, I’ve read practically every post and watched every BTS (Behind The Scenes) video that Melissa has done, picking up a tip (or three) every single time. Let’s get one thing out the way first. A lot of photographers say they are fashion photographers. What they really mean is that they’d like to be fashion photographers but, as Zack Arias points out, just taking a pretty picture of a pretty girl in pretty clothing isn’t fashion photography. To shoot fashion, you have to live it, breathe it, consume it. You have to truly love the subject and understand it. Just as importantly, you have to shoot for fashion. By those simple standards, Melissa Rodwell is most definitely a fashion photographer. Melissa’s client list is pretty darn impressive. Among others, she counts as her clients Ralph Lauren, KURV, Mademoiselle, and Harper’s Bazaar. She has shot in locations all over the world, from New York to Dubai, and has exhibited her work in Australia and Amsterdam. She has repeatedly broken out of her role as a fashion photographer to work on personal projects. Now, there are a lot of fashion photographers out there. The major markets are flooded with people looking for work in that industry. There are, however, two things that make Melissa pretty unique and cause her to stand out in...
Photo Finds, June 15, 2012 – Matt Furman

Photo Finds, June 15, 2012 – Matt Furman

Welcome to Photo Finds, a feature where we point you to some of the best photography around the web. The business of photography isn’t an easy one. If you’re a pro, you have to deliver – and you have to do it consistently, day after day. Even more difficult is the fact that you have to stay fresh, flexible, stay in tune with the styles of the day, and evolve with time. Few photographers can do this over any length of time. Matt Furman, a commercial and editorial photographer based in New York city, is one of these few. With a client roster that includes Forbes, CFO Magazine, American Airlines, Billboard, and Barron’s, Matt’s work reflects a sort results-oriented aesthetic that stops far short of being “typical.” I first came across Matt’s work in an interview he did for the awesome website “Feature Shoot.” That article is a must-read, by the way; it gives you an insight into Matt’s shooting practices and the kind of constraints he often works under. Those constraints are what makes his work so interesting. When someone says, “I’m a commercial photographer,” my mind immediately goes to a setup with massive lights (at least six of them) and a whole crew of assistants and gophers. In reality, Matthew often works with just one or two lights, utilizing location, ambient lighting, and other visual tools to add interest and drama to his images. Take his image of AMC network president Charlie Collier, for example (below). Here, Matt uses a zombie dummy from the popular AMC show “Walking Dead” to add that additional punch in what might otherwise be a standard...
Photo Finds, June 18, 2012 – Daniel Milnor

Photo Finds, June 18, 2012 – Daniel Milnor

Welcome to Photo Finds, a feature where we point you to some of the best photography around the web. A Leica, a Hasselblad, a few rolls of film. That’s pretty-much photographer Daniel Milnor’s ammunition when he goes out shooting. Whether it’s along the streets of Paris or in the wilds of Machu Pichu, Daniel’s style of documentary photography stands out head and shoulders above the crowd. Daniel refers to his work as “classic Black and White documentary work,” and I think the description really does fit. There’s an air of old-world richness to his images that’s evocative of the golden age of black and white photography (think Cartier-Bresson, Dorothea Lange, and Robert Frank), and some of them might as well have been taken in the mid-20th century. There are two things that I find particularly fascinating about Daniel’s work. The first is the curated nature of the work he posts.Every image I see online seems to be carefully considered, and presented with a certain reverence. Daniel doesn’t indulge in the kind of spray-and-pray photography I see so often (and that I myself am sometimes guilty of). Rather, he seems to shoot and edit with care, and his body of work reflects that attention to detail. The Leica Files, a series of video posts that Daniel has been putting up on his website, adds credence to that hypothesis. Here, he takes one image per video post and talks about it. Normally used to seeing a ton of content packed into as little time as possible, this hit-the-brakes-hard approach is almost a relief for me. The second thing that captures my...
Photo Finds – June 11, 2012: Zack Arias

Photo Finds – June 11, 2012: Zack Arias

Welcome to Photo Finds, a feature where we point you to some of the best photography around the web. This week’s Photo Finds is a very specific one. We’re not just going to talk about a specific photographer; we’re going to talk about a specific photographer shooting a specific genre. A lot of you have already heard of photographer and teacher Zack Arias before. We’ve certainly mentioned him on our blog repeatedly, and his lighting workshop on creativeLIVE ranks as one of our top lighting resources to date. He’s also easily one of the most eloquent and honest photographers I know of. That same honesty and eloquence has, of late, manifested itself in a style of photography that’s pretty different from the portraiture that brought Zack his initial acclaim. Yet, despite its difference, there’s something uniquely Zack about it, and that’s why I’m talking about it today. Recently, Zack was named one of the top 50 street photographers around today by Complex magazine. And, despite being someone who’s been following his street photography since he starting blogging about shooting film back in April of last year, it took me a moment to digest that. That’s because I hadn’t really thought of Zack as a street photographer. Yet it’s his images of street scenes in New York, Atlanta, Dubai, and Bombay that are among my favorites right now. I have always equated Zack with his studio work, and my mental image of him is forever linked to white seamless backgrounds with gorgeously crafted light in a studio. Avedon, I once mused, would shoot like Zack if he’d been into urban hip-hop culture. So...