Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive

Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Creative Suite Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His latest article guides novice Lightroom users and those confused when linking a Lightroom library with  an updated hard drive configuration. Continue on if you have ever experienced those perplexing question marks when attempting to work with a previously imported file within Lightroom. Move Your Lightroom Library to a New Hard Drive by Seán Duggan One sure thing about digital photography is that, like the universe, your image library and the amount of hard drive space it requires is always expanding. And, if you’ve upgraded to a camera with more megapixels, it may be expanding faster than you originally thought it would! As your image archive grows you’ll eventually run out of space on your current hard drive or drives and you’ll need to move the files onto newer and larger capacity storage media. In this short episode of the Lightroom Viewfinder, I will show you how to move your Lightroom image library onto a new hard drive and then re-link everything to the Lightroom catalog file so you don’t run into those vexing question marks that appear when Lightroom can’t find the folder it’s looking for. Seán Duggan is the co-author of Photoshop Masking & Composting, Real World Digital Photography, and The Creative Digital Darkroom. He is on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts in New York City and leads workshops all around the world. See all of Duggan’s Lightroom tips below: • Lightroom Keywording Tips • Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog • Adding Value to Your Image Archive with Keywords •...
A Trip to the Bottom of the World: Photographing Antarctica

A Trip to the Bottom of the World: Photographing Antarctica

Dean J. Tatooles specializes in fine art panoramic landscape photography, wildlife photography, and indigenous portraiture from remote locations around the world. He also works with top-rated travel companies and fellow professional photographers to lead photographic safaris in locations like Kenya, Uganda, Nepal, Morocco and more. Recently back from a trip to Antarctica, Tatooles shares some helpful knowledge for making the most of a polar adventure. In his pack, Dean carried Nikon D3s and D800E DSLR bodies with Nikkor AFS 80-400mm f 4.5-5.6 ED VR and 70-200mm f2.8 G AF-S ED VRII lenses. Continue reading to find out what Tatooles suggests when considering a trip to the frozen continent. A Trip to the Bottom of the World: Photographing Antarctica by Dean J. Tatooles Picking the Right Tour Company is Essential It goes without saying that someone interested in traveling to Antarctica can’t simply go online, book a flight and hotel, pack their bags, and shove off like they would for most other international destinations. It can be a daunting task trying to find a reputable tour company that is a good fit for you. I’ve been to Antarctica multiple times and have traveled with more than one tour company. Personally, I recommend Polar Latitudes for someone who has a keen interest in photography. Among other eco-experts at your disposal, Polar Latitudes has a staffed professional photographer on each voyage to instruct its expedition members both onboard and out in the field. It really doesn’t matter if you’ve never picked up a camera or are a professional yourself. You will undoubtedly come back home with the best images possible and expand your technical knowledge. Best...
First Impressions of the Canon 11-24mm f/4

First Impressions of the Canon 11-24mm f/4

All sorts of adjectives have been used to describe the new Canon 11-24mm f/4 lens recently announced at the top of 2015. World’s widest rectilinear lens, best of its kind, unheard of, the ultimate in wide-angle photography, etc. Borrowlenses.com received its first shipment from Canon and eagerly took it for a spin. Read on to find out what we thought of the much-hyped Canon 11-24mm f/4 lens. With all this lens has to offer, it’s best to start with its inherent design. First and foremost it is the newest addition to Canon’s professional L series lenses and fills the gap as the widest angle rectilinear zoom lens offered by any lens manufacturer at this time. It boasts a 126° angle of view at its widest (11mm), with a fixed maximum aperture of f/4 throughout the full focal range of ultra-wide to standard angle of view. According to Canon, the Canon 11-24mm f/4 is designed with the largest lens element made [3/12/15], measuring in at an 87mm diameter. Additional 3 glass elements make up the lens as well as Ultra-low Dispersion and Super UD lens elements to reduce chromatic aberration and minimize distortion throughout the focal range. Similar to the other L series lenses, multiple lens element coatings have also been integrated to optimize contrast in the final image. Canon has suggested this lens is best suited for architecture, interior design, and landscapes due to its minimal distortion. Typically lenses of this width distort straight lines, making them appear curved if composed outside of the sweet spot of the frame. This distortion, however, is significantly reduced with Canon’s technological advancements when designing...
Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog

Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog

Seán Duggan is a fine art photographer, author, educator, and an Adobe Certified Creative Suite Expert with extensive experience in both the traditional and digital darkroom. His latest article guides novice Lightroom users and anyone having trouble or confusion with the import process. Continue on if you have ever experienced images not ending up where they are intended or in redundant, misplaced nested folders after importing.   Take Control of Lightroom’s Import Dialog by Seán Duggan If you’ve ever imported files into Lightroom and had the files end up in the wrong place, or the import resulted in the creation of redundant nested folders that created confusion in your image archive, this new tutorial video is for you! It shows you how to take control of the Lightroom import process by understanding how the options in the Destination panel affect where the images go and whether or not any nested subfolders are created. Once you know how this panel works, you’ll be the one in the driver’s seat of the Import Dialog, not Lightroom. I also cover how to save Import Presets to improve the speed and accuracy of the import process. Seán Duggan is the co-author of Photoshop Masking & Composting, Real World Digital Photography, and The Creative Digital Darkroom. He is on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts in New York City and leads workshops all around the world. See all of Duggan’s Lightroom tips below: • Lightroom Keywording Tips • Adding Value to Your Image Archive with Keywords • Adobe Lightroom Tips for Beginners: Merging a Travel Catalog with your Main Catalog • Adobe Lightroom Tips for Beginners: The Island of Lost Files • The Lightroom-Photoshop Connection:...
Traveling Cross Country? Tips to Photograph Your Trip: Part 2

Traveling Cross Country? Tips to Photograph Your Trip: Part 2

Shortly after finishing a cross country trip to relocate to a new part of the country, I reflected on some practical photographic lessons I learned. We had to get across the country quickly by car and it is hard to photograph under those circumstance. I compiled some tips for others who may be faced with a similar trip and who want to take pictures along the way. The following are helpful tips for the cross country traveling photographer. Packing a Bag: Bring What You Know, Pack Light I logged a lot of internet hours trying to decide what was best to include in my camera bag before departing. What I ultimately decided on was to pack simple and not include any new systems that may trip me up when trying to act fast. I was very interested in shooting with a mirrorless camera. However, on the test run I decided against it because I was just not familiar enough with it. I knew it was better for me to be able to quickly navigate my settings than to sacrifice for weight and size. Had I gotten comfortable with a more compact system and felt confident that I would be able to act fast with it, I would have certainly opted for a small form factor! Instead I chose a Nikon D7100 for its relatively lightweight body, familiar DSLR controls, and 24MP count with an option to shoot video. The crop sensor was a conscious decision as I am still very excited about using the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC zoom lens and wanted to put it to the the ulitmate test while on the road (it performed fantastically)! The...