Photographing the Lunar Eclipse

Photographing the Lunar Eclipse

Rent your super telephoto lenses now so that they arrive in time for you to shoot the lunar eclipse, which is happening next week, April 14th and 15th, 2014. This is the first visible total lunar eclipse since December 10th, 2011. The first hints of action begin at approximately 12:30AM EDT with the real action not starting until about 3AM EDT (better details below) – prepare coffee. For those who don’t know, a lunar eclipse occurs when the sun, Earth, and moon line up so that the Earth’s shadow falls on the moon, darkening it and producing a “rusty” color which is why some people call this a “Blood Moon”. This is caused, for those light nerds out there, by refraction of sunlight by the Earth’s atmosphere. It’s pretty cool stuff and you won’t want to miss capturing it. Here to give us some tips on how to that is Michael Frye, a professional photographer who specializes in landscapes and nature with plenty of experience shooting the lunar eclipse. Michael’s photographs and articles about photographic art and technique have appeared in publications around the world, and he is the author and/or principal photographer of four books: The Photographer’s Guide to Yosemite, Yosemite Meditations, Yosemite Meditations for Women, and Digital Landscape Photography: In the Footsteps of Ansel Adams and the Great Masters. Michael has also written three eBooks: Light & Land: Landscapes in the Digital Darkroom, Exposure for Outdoor Photography, and Landscapes in Lightroom 5: The Essential Step-by-Step Guide. Photographing the Lunar Eclipse by Michael Frye On the night of April 14th and 15th, viewers in North America will be able to see a...
Visual Vitamin D: Inspiration for Spring Shooting

Visual Vitamin D: Inspiration for Spring Shooting

Longer days, weddings, and vacations – there is a lot to look forward to in spring (unless you’re a night-photographing curmudgeon workaholic – you know who you are). Here are some inspirational images from our friends that exude “spring” to them in their own way. Hopefully they will inspire you to stay out late (or stay inside the studio – the sun is overrated anyway) and shoot, shoot, shoot! “For me, spring means I’m one step closer to being able to shoot outdoors underwater again. Cast off the shackles of winter and stuff them away with your winter coat and boots! Rejoice that you no longer have to stress about your car not being plugged in overnight and you can use those precious neurotransmitters dreaming up new ways to break your creative mold. Spring is for new growth, so try new things and push your limits!” – Renee Robyn “Spring is a time of rebirth and regrowth. The weather, so often inclement, forces many to stay inside. Explore during those brief moments when the weather pauses. Discover unique and interesting ways to compose something that you know has been photographed before. Use the built up energy of waiting for winter to end to explore with new eyes and new creativity. And don’t forget to look somewhere on the ground near you for all of that water that has been falling from the sky to reflect that momentary break.” – Jay Goodrich “Once during a cold winter I decided I wanted to photograph some beauty shots by a blooming tree. Then spring came. I watched trees getting dressed in gorgeous colorful...
Capturing the Surf: an Interview with Photographer Seth Migdail

Capturing the Surf: an Interview with Photographer Seth Migdail

Seth Migdail is a surf photographer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. A regular at Mavericks, his work has been featured in a number of outlets, including Surfline.com and theinertia.com. I sat down with Seth to talk about his work, his process, and what it takes to break into the insular surfing community. How did you get started in photography? I grew up as an artist, doing drawing and painting. I found photography in college, and ended up dumping two years worth of art school and pursued that. I have a fine art background, a BFA in photography, so I came up in the analog world. I shot a lot of large format, medium format – that’s how I got started. Back then, in fine-art school, you take a lot of time to try and find your identity. It took me a while, but I eventually did. I did a lot of documentary photography, what I’d call “social landscapes.” I got a solid foundation in the craft that way. I also did a lot of work in the studio. What is your favorite subject, and why? Definitely surfing. I found surfing when I moved out to California. Growing up in New York, I hadn’t surfed at all, and I only discovered it when I moved up to San Luis Obispo. I’d actually put photography aside for a few years and kinda became a surf bum down there. When I moved up to the Bay Area, I suffered an injury that kept me out of the water, and I started shooting again. At the time, Mavericks was just re-forming...
Need an Extra Hand? Trials Begin at BorrowLenses for Photography Assistant Rental

Need an Extra Hand? Trials Begin at BorrowLenses for Photography Assistant Rental

Logistically messy and perhaps ethically unorthodox, we labored over the decision to start offering actual, human photography assistants for rent. The demand was too high to ignore and so we’re launching a trial run. Finally, picking up an extra hand is now as easy as getting a spare body. Gone are the days of posting to Craig’s List at the last minute hoping for the cheapest GWC. Heck, rent our guy and he’ll hand carry your lens rentals to your gig – talk about saving on shipping! Rent our new Photography Assistant today. Curious what the experience is like? See the video review on our...
Photographing Your Dinner: Restaurant Dos and Don’ts

Photographing Your Dinner: Restaurant Dos and Don’ts

Are you a food-for-pleasure type of person?  If the answer is yes, then I can say with confidence that we may all be guilty of snapping a few pics of our meals from time to time. Some of us seek out new and exciting restaurants that offer avant-garde food and interior design.  Others rejoice in old school pleasures of down home diners and off-the-beaten-path food attractions. Whatever your guilty pleasure is, here are a few tips and tricks to heighten your “foodie” photography. 1) Ask Your Server if Photography is OK Chefs tend to be fun and playful characters with creativity in the kitchen that at times can inspire more than just an appetite. Food has long been photographed but taking pictures when your food arrives to the table is a newer fad. According to the New York Times, there has been a growing backlash of taking pictures of your meals while dining out. Restaurants and Chefs have been “burned” by disruptive behavior that interrupts the dining experience and have discovered less-than-appetizing images of their dishes online. This has become a big enough problem that there is an upswing in restaurants who have put restrictions on the photography allowed to be taken – even stealthily on your phone. This movement has gone as far as banning people from taking pictures inside the restaurant all together! The best way to avoid any embarrassment, as well as increase your level of comfort if you are moved to photograph your meal, would be to ask your server first.  The establishment will appreciate your consideration and will most often give you the thumbs up....