Canon Rebel SL1 Impressions

Canon Rebel SL1 Impressions

Having been exposed to the most lusted after, review topping gear such as the 1DX and super telephoto lenses on a daily basis, a person tends to start looking for interesting gear experiences with less common choices. Take the Rebel SL1, for example (yes, we ARE aware of the huge gap in performance expectations). We have been using this body for some time now behind-the-scenes and despite its undesirable plastic build, tiny pentamirror viewfinder, and ridiculously small size, we started to um…like it! Here is why we would recommend trying this body out the next time you are considering something new for casual everyday shooting, travel photography, portraits, or landscapes. Light as A Feather With battery, memory card, and strap included, the camera weighs in at about 1 lb. It pairs extremely well with a smallish telephoto such as the 70-200mm f/4L IS, tipping the scale at a bit under 2.5 lbs. That is an absolute featherweight in the world of DSLRs and puts absolutely no toll on your body after a day of shooting. Capacitive Touch Screen Change your focus point, alter your exposure settings, and review your images all using the touch screen. This all makes a lot of sense on a camera this small! There is also a dedicated ISO button located on the top of the panel. Hit that button, touch the setting you want on the LCD, and go. It’s Still a DSLR Mirrorless cameras are the technology of the future. However, there are some pretty good reasons why not to make the complete changeover yet. Continuous autofocus is a good reason to stick with DSLRs for...
Canon 70D – Continuous Autofocus With STM Lenses

Canon 70D – Continuous Autofocus With STM Lenses

Have you ever tried to autofocus in Live View with a DSLR? Pretty crummy, right? The Canon 70D changes that a bit with what they call Dual Pixel CMOS AF. This fairly new technology allows smooth, continuous autofocus (Canon calls is Movie Servo AF) while recording video. Continue on to view the test footage recorded when paired with Canon’s STM lenses. You may also be wondering what STM stands for in all these newly released Canon lenses! It stands for STepping Motor and it is the newest technology developed by Canon to better enable smooth video capture. Lenses designed with STM technology produce super smooth continuous autofocus even while shooting video. In addition, STM lenses are silent, eliminating traditional AF noise that was known to creep into video. We took the 24-105mm STM lens out to gather some example footage to share with you. Overall the AF tracks pretty well and pulls smoothly. Combined with the 70D, the AF experience is much more camcorder-like than what is the norm shooting with DSLRs. So there you have it! An easy solution to shoot some basic video, especially if you are just breaking in and would like a good head start into the popular world of DSLR video production. Incidentally, you can also take advantage of the Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology in the new Canon 7D Mark ll. Let us know your feedback and how you enjoyed this setup or what you would recommend in the comments...
BorrowLenses Year in Review: The Cameras of 2013

BorrowLenses Year in Review: The Cameras of 2013

2013 is a record year for new camera models at BorrowLenses.com, which means having the biggest selection of models we’ve ever had. There is something for every kind of photographer, from mirrorless pocket cameras to huge 60+ megapixel medium format DLSRs. We selected a bunch of our favorites from this bountiful season. Discover what’s available for exploration in our year-in-review. Mirrorless/MFT/Compact Panasonic’s GX7 boasts in-body stabilization and Light Speed AF all inside a super stylish design with a comfortable rubber grip. Other notable features include an impressive action-stopping 1/8000th of a second shutter ability and flash syncing at 1/320th of a second and a DSLR-esque twin-dial control system. The fully 90 degree tilting viewfinder is also a welcome feature. The GX7 has this crazy 40 FPS mode when using the electronic shutter. However, to use it you are limited to reduced-resolution JPEGs but it’s still a fun option to have. Autofocus on the GX7 is blazingly fast. AF locks onto the subject immediately even in low light where manual focus is often the only option. Continuous AF, however, still tends to hunt around as one would expect with no phase-detect sensors. Overall, the GX7 is comfortable, cool looking, and accommodates a vast array of MFT-mount lenses that are very fast. Pairs well with: Panasonic 35-100mm f/2.8 Lumix G Vario Zoom Lens Fuji’s X100 set the gold standard for retro design when it first came out. Since then it has continued that tradition, packing increasingly advanced technology into the classically designed mirrorless cameras that take their cues more from rangefinders of yesterday than anything else. The success to the X100 is the “s” variant of...
Kodak’s First Canon-based DSLR: A 1.3 Megapixel Slice of Photographic History

Kodak’s First Canon-based DSLR: A 1.3 Megapixel Slice of Photographic History

The San Francisco Chronicle ran this photo on the front page of the paper the day after the 49ers won the Super Bowl in 1995. The picture shows Jerry Rice, whose 10 catches for 149 yards and 3 touchdowns tied his own record for most touchdown receptions in a Super Bowl and the 49ers became the 1st team to win 5 Super Bowls. However, that wasn’t the only remarkable event of Super Bowl XXIX. The above picture was shot on Kodak’s very first Canon-based digital SLR–a 1.3 megapixel, no-LCD, nearly 4-pound behemoth that cost around $16,000. The image above was the first taken on this camera and published in an American newspaper. This photo of a legacy marks the beginning of a revolution for digital imaging. When this photo was taken (you can see more from the set here), the Canon EOS-DSC 3 hadn’t even been released to the public yet (it would be released later in 1995). The camera was, in essence, a modified Canon EOS-1N film camera and modified Kodak NC2000e digital camera back put together. Kodak produced all of the major electronic components while maintaining the Canon EF lens mount. Approximately 189 images could be stored on a 260MB hard disk PC card and, with only 5 focus points and a maximum continuous shooting speed of 2.7 fps in 12-frame bursts, Chronicle photographer Fred Larsen did a tremendous job capturing these sports shots. Larsen, purportedly, had only had the camera for a couple of hours before having to go out on assignment with it. He nailed this shot with the help of a Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L USM, which would have had an effective focal length of around 510mms on the...
Photo Finds, July 16, 2012 – Philip Bloom

Photo Finds, July 16, 2012 – Philip Bloom

Welcome to Photo Finds, a feature where we point you to some of the best photography and videography around the web. One of the most popular sliders that we rent here at BorrowLenses.com is the Philip Bloom Slider by Kessler. I was speaking about this to a customer recently and she asked me, “Who’s Philip Bloom?” The question took me by surprise a bit. Who’s Philip Bloom? Who’s Philip Bloom? Why, he’s… Philip Bloom! How could anyone not know who Philip Bloom is? Then, reality intervened and I realized that not everyone knows every filmmaker and photographer whose work I follow religiously. I’m “in the industry,” as it as, so I know darn well who Philip Bloom is. I explained it to the hapless customer. “Philip Bloom is this English guy. He makes movies.” That grotesquely understated and inadequate introduction notwithstanding, Philip Bloom is one of those independent filmmakers that everyone who’s ever switched their DSLR to “video” mode should know about. Philip has been in the industry for more than 20 years, and for the past five or so, he’s been an advocate for what he calls “the low budget film look.” Through cameras like the Canon 5DmkII and more recently the Panasonic AF100 and Sony F3. Please visit my DSLR films section to see just how beautiful they look. I have used these DSLRs on all sorts of projects from music videos to commercials and documentaries. I recently was also the 5D Cinematographer on the new WWII movie from Lucasfilm, “RED TAILS” and shot the BAFTA/ RAINDANCE winning documentary “How to start a revolution”. The thing to know...