Kodak’s First Canon-based DSLR: A 1.3 Megapixel Slice of Photographic History

Kodak’s First Canon-based DSLR: A 1.3 Megapixel Slice of Photographic History

The San Francisco Chronicle ran this photo on the front page of the paper the day after the 49ers won the Super Bowl in 1995. The picture shows Jerry Rice, whose 10 catches for 149 yards and 3 touchdowns tied his own record for most touchdown receptions in a Super Bowl and the 49ers became the 1st team to win 5 Super Bowls. However, that wasn’t the only remarkable event of Super Bowl XXIX. The above picture was shot on Kodak’s very first Canon-based digital SLR–a 1.3 megapixel, no-LCD, nearly 4-pound behemoth that cost around $16,000. The image above was the first taken on this camera and published in an American newspaper. This photo of a legacy marks the beginning of a revolution for digital imaging. When this photo was taken (you can see more from the set here), the Canon EOS-DSC 3 hadn’t even been released to the public yet (it would be released later in 1995). The camera was, in essence, a modified Canon EOS-1N film camera and modified Kodak NC2000e digital camera back put together. Kodak produced all of the major electronic components while maintaining the Canon EF lens mount. Approximately 189 images could be stored on a 260MB hard disk PC card and, with only 5 focus points and a maximum continuous shooting speed of 2.7 fps in 12-frame bursts, Chronicle photographer Fred Larsen did a tremendous job capturing these sports shots. Larsen, purportedly, had only had the camera for a couple of hours before having to go out on assignment with it. He nailed this shot with the help of a Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L USM, which would have had an effective focal length of around 510mms on the...
Metabones Canon EF to Sony NEX Speed Booster Adds Full Frame Versatility in the Crop Sensor Video World

Metabones Canon EF to Sony NEX Speed Booster Adds Full Frame Versatility in the Crop Sensor Video World

Make No Bones About It: the Metabones Adapter is Kind of Amazing The Metabones Canon EF to Sony NEX Speed Booster allows you to mount any Canon EF-mount lens onto compatible Sony NEX E-mount cameras, such as the Sony FS-700, Sony FS-100, or Sony Alpha NEX- 7. What makes this simple adapter anything but simple is its ability to increase your maximum aperture and make your lens 0.71x wider! Think of this adapter as being the opposite of a teleconverter. A teleconverter expands the image being projected onto your camera’s sensor, giving us a telephoto crop but also losing light in the process. Teleconverters are popular among nature and outdoor sports photographers who need the extra reach and don’t mind losing a little light to get it.  The Metabones Speed Booster, conversely, narrows the image being projected onto the sensor. The image then fills the cropped sensor similarly to how the lens would fill a full frame sensor. The resulting image is still slightly cropped, but less so than if you were just shooting with the crop sensor alone and no adapter. Does It Really Work? When comparing a Sony video camera using a standard Metabones adapter (which only allows Canon EF lenses to be mounted on Sony NEX cameras with no additional changes) against the Metabones Speed Booster, our video team did notice a significant change in field of view.  For example, they put a 50mm EF lens on an E-Mount Sony camera, which has a 1.6x crop factor. This essentially makes that 50mm lens read like an 80mm lens.  When using the Speed Booster, that “80mm” lens was “widened” by a factor of 0.71x, which makes...
Our Take and Test Footage on the Canon 1D C DSLR with 4K Video

Our Take and Test Footage on the Canon 1D C DSLR with 4K Video

Canon has added yet another camera to their cinema line, the 1D C.  This addition gives professional and novice filmmakers alike a formidable number of shooting choices, not to mention access to a wide variety of cine-lenses. It is also a very sports-friendly camera, shooting at 14 FPS for up to 400,000 cycles with its newly-designed shutter and carbon fiber blades. But what really stands out about this camera–especially when compared to the established C300 and the new C100 and C500? Form Factor The Canon 1D C retains the same DSLR form factor that Canon popularized with the 5D Mark II. It is a lightweight package that will be familiar to many videographers. Having so many shooting features in a small package will be particularly appealing to those who travel a lot or just need to pack light. Everything from Before, Plus More This pro body DSLR retains a lot of the photography options of the 1D X but also shoots 4K video. This is a boon, especially for sports shooters who need the quick shutter bursts but who may also want to introduce great video into their portfolios without having to carry multiple bodies. 4K The resolution of 4K is 4096 x 2160, which is 4 times the size and resolution of full 1080 HD. This is really useful for those who’d like to crop down an image and still have a lot of detail in the shot (again, useful for both videographers and sports photographers but also a nice bonus for wildlife shooters).  4K is becoming very popular and companies are releasing more and more 4K TVs and...
The Canon MP-E 65mm Macro Puts the Microscopic Within Reach

The Canon MP-E 65mm Macro Puts the Microscopic Within Reach

The Canon MP-E 65mm Macro Lens is one of BorrowLenses.com’s most unique lenses. The MP-E is more than a macro lens–it is a portable microscope with the ability to fill an entire 35mm frame with the texture of something as small as a grain of rice. Floating internal lens elements keep the resolution sharp throughout the range of focus at 1x, life-size, to 5x magnification, or 5 times life-size. The Canon MP-E 65mm’s magnification essentially begins where other macro lenses, such as Canon’s 100mm, end. The focus distance range is very small–only 41mm at 5x–but this allows for tremendous detail of very small objects, including the tips of pens or the eyes of a butterfly. Since this is a dedicated macro lens, it cannot focus more than a few centimeters away from the front element. This is not your ordinary 65mm lens and to properly shoot with it you will need a couple of tools. What You Need to Shoot Macro Rails This lens is manual-focus only and you will need to use a macro rail, such as our StackShot Extended Macro Rail or our Mini Novoflex Focusing Rack. These provide essential support to prevent blur from lens shake (which is very noticeable at higher magnifications) and allows for micro adjustments in distance to and from your diminutive subject. Macro Ring Lights The effective aperture is going to be much smaller than what is displayed on your camera due to the extreme magnification of the lens. Keep this in mind when calculating your exposure–your aperture needs to be multiplied by the magnification, plus 1, that you are using. For example, if...
Quick Tip: Optimize Canon 5D Mark III Write Speeds – Avoid Using SD Cards

Quick Tip: Optimize Canon 5D Mark III Write Speeds – Avoid Using SD Cards

Buffer Sluggish on 5D Mark III? Ditch the SD Card! Photographer Jeff Cable discovered something interesting about the 5D Mark III when he was doing some high-speed shooting–it’s slow, but only under certain circumstances. His advice? Pass on using the SD slot if you happen to be writing the same image to both cards and care about clearing your buffer quickly: “…YOU DO NOT want to put a card in the SD slot. Why? Because, for some reason unbeknownst to me, Canon decided to build the 5D Mark III with one very fast CF slot which supports the newer UDMA7 protocol and a standard SD card slot which does NOT support the high speed standard (called UHS – for Ultra High Speed). This is really strange because many other cameras have come out with UHS1 compatible slots over the last year. Without UHS support, the top speed that can be achieved by the SD card is 133x. This is true even if you purchase a 600x SD card and insert it in the camera. The best you will get is 133x…” Why is this happening? The 5D Mark III defaults to the slowest card that is in the camera at the time. If you want to take full advantage of your professional CF card, leave the SD slot alone–save it for times when speed isn’t important but having backups or more storage is. On any camera with dual card slots (this includes pro bodies, such as the Canon 1D x and Nikon D4, as well as the Nikon D800 and Sony A99), it will default to the lowest card speed...