4 Important Things to Know About Canon’s New 40mm Pancake Lens

4 Important Things to Know About Canon’s New 40mm Pancake Lens

1. Long History of a Short Lens What’s all the fuss surrounding Canon’s new 40mm “pancake” lens? So called because of their flat, short-barrel look, pancake lenses are primes made with thin glass and have been a convenient carry-along for photographers for over 100 years. They are an unobtrusive lens with aesthetic appeal, a longtime favorite in the mirrorless/Micro Four Thirds crowd. Canon has finally jumped on the bandwagon with its inaugural pancake: the EF 40mm f/2.8. 2. Better Focusing Distance and Bokeh Most pancakes fall into the normal-to-wide focal range and this one is no exception. While most, especially older, pancake lenses are unable to focus down on anything closer than 18 inches, this one is able to home in at a relatively close 11.8 inches. And with 7 diaphragm blades at f2.8, the bokeh on this lens is quite good. 3. STM Enables Video Auto Focusing on the Canon Rebel T4i This lens is certainly a great go-t0 for travelers looking to pack light, however, the technology of the 40mm is principally for video and will allow the camera to focus continuously while shooting video. The STM (STepping Motor) feature of this lens offers smooth and quiet continuous auto focusing when used with the video functionality of the new Canon Rebel T4i (for our review of the T4i, click here). 4. Why a 40mm Focal Length? But why 40mm’s? The focal length is certainly a bit of a novelty. The most commonly-found lengths for prime lenses are 35mm, 50mm, 85mm, and 100mm (with 24mm becoming a favorite as well). For some, it is just a matter of having a...
Tip of the Week: Use a Tilt-Shift Lens for Panoramic Photos

Tip of the Week: Use a Tilt-Shift Lens for Panoramic Photos

Every week, we post a photography-related tip on our blog. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. There are many ways to create panoramic images. You can start with a really wide-angle lens, then simply crop down to a long, narrow band to create a “faux” panorama. You can also use the built-in panoramic functions of cameras like Sony’s NEX and Alpha series, as well as Fuji’s X100 and X-Pro1. You can also simply take a series of pictures and stitch them together in Photoshop, or, if you’re really into panoramic photography, you could rent a pano-head from us, like the ones from Nodal Ninja. Today, we’re going to talk about one of my favorite ways to create panoramas. All of the methods above have some shortcomings that make it a bit harder to create good panos. Using a wide-angle lens and cropping, for example, leaves me with a lower-resolution file than I’d like. The built-in pano features in some cameras is neat, and I do use them (as shown in Figure 1), but they’re also relatively low-res JPEGs. Pano heads are great for this sort of work, but you have to find the “nodal point” of each lens you want to use, and that takes quite a bit of work. Tilt-shift lenses are a great alternative for creating panoramic images. Traditionally, these are used by architectural and landscape photographers to avoid distortion or...
Tip of the Week: Behold the Frankencam!

Tip of the Week: Behold the Frankencam!

The practice of swapping lenses between platforms via adapters isn’t something new. Back in October 2011, for example, we wrote about using Canon, Nikon, and Leica lenses with Micro 4/3 cameras. Similarly, you can use an adapter to mount Nikon lenses onto Canon cameras, but until recently, this was limited to a smaller subset of Nikon lenses. The “D” lenses from Nikon, the ones with manual aperture rings like the Nikon 35mm f/2, could be used via an adapter on Canon cameras. You could manipulate the aperture manually on the lens, and set the shutter speed on your camera. DSLR video shooters quickly took to these lenses for this very reason. However, Nikon’s “G” class of lenses couldn’t be used with those adapters as there was no way to control the aperture on them as they lacked a manual aperture ring. The aperture was controlled electronically from the camera itself, and Canon cameras could not communicate with the lens in order to do so. Enter the Nikon G Lens to Canon Camera adapter. This ingenious little device allows not only the mounting of a Nikon lens to a Canon camera (like the older adapter we carry for “D” lenses), but also lets you mount a “G” lens onto your Canon body – and gives you a way to control the lens’ aperture mechanically. If you look at the adapter itself, there are two blue tabs attached to it. Once the lens is attached to the adapter, those blue tabs move a small lever on the lens itself that opens and closes the aperture. Looking through the viewfinder on your...

Canon 5DMarkIII Review by OliviaTech.com

We spent a day with OliviaTech testing out the capabilities of the new Canon 5DMarkIII. We took it into a full production setting to shoot a music video and then into her studio to compare the ISO sensitivity, rolling shutter, and aliasing vs its predecessor, the Canon 5DMarkII. Check out the video review below and her full write up here. Longer video clips available for you to download at Canon 5D Mark II vs Canon 5D Mark III Video...
The BigmOS: A Review Of Sigma’s Stabilized 50-500mm Lens

The BigmOS: A Review Of Sigma’s Stabilized 50-500mm Lens

Introduction BorrowLenses.com has carried the non-stablized version of the Sigma 50-500 for some time now. That lens, nicknamed the “Bigma” has been something of a cult favorite, despite its many failings. We recently introduced what I consider to be its older, more grown-up sibling, the Sigma 50-500mm lens with Optical Stablization, to our inventory as well. I took the Canon version of this lens, nicknamed the “BigmOS”, out for a spin to put it through a few paces. Let’s get this out of the way immediately: when you use a lens like the Sigma 50–500mm f/4.5–6.3 APO DG OS HSM (there’s a mouthful for you), you really do have to keep your expectations in check. If you can remember that any lens with a 10x zoom factor is going to compromise quality and adjust the bar accordingly, you’ll walk away with some pretty decent images. On the surface, the idea of having a lens that goes from a pretty standard 50mm focal length all the way out to 500mm might seem like a wonderful thing. Why on earth would you carry that big, heavy, 500mm f/4 lens out to your first wildlife photography trip when you can have this thing and hand-hold it, at least for a while? That’s a question we get asked quite often with this lens, and the answer to it can be summed up in one word: quality. When you have a lens with as many moving lens elements (the individual pieces of glass inside the lens’ barrel), you are going to see a fair amount of quality loss. Prime lenses like the 500mm f/4 from...