Get Your Gear On With the Canon 1Dx

Get Your Gear On With the Canon 1Dx

We’ve been waiting for this bit of kit for a long, long time. The 1Dx is finally here, and we run through a bunch of the features of Canon’s flagship body. This full-frame camera is set to replace the 1D mkiV and the 1Ds mk III. We show off the high frame-rate, some AF features, compare ISO settings and give a general rundown of this exciting new professional DSLR. The 1Dx is available for rent now at http://www.borrowlenses.com/product/Canon_EOS_1D_X_Digital_SLR “Bullet-Time Backflip” sequence...
5 Things Worth Celebrating About the New Canon 1D X

5 Things Worth Celebrating About the New Canon 1D X

A new member is about to officially join the BorrowLenses Canon 1D pro body family tomorrow. The 1D X (“X” representing the merger, or “crossover”, of the 1D and 1Ds series) takes the impossible choice out of sports/wildlife vs portrait/landscape by being able to, seemingly, do everything! 1. Speed The 1D X has the fastest FPS of any 1D so far (up to 14 FPS). 2. AF Overhaul The 1D X uses a 61-point/41 cross-type AF system. Cross-type focus allows for higher accuracy in contrast detection. 3. Big, Better Sensor With a 18.1 Mp full-frame sensor, the 1D X produces images up to 5184 x 3456 in size and uses the latest photodiode construction technologies (which results in increased light sensitivity). 4. Increased Light Sensitivity! Not only does the ISO range go up to 204,800 on the 1D X, but the Auto Lighting Optimiser that was used during the ID Mark IV era has been improved. This is particularly useful when a subject is backlit. 5. Video As if the 1D X doesn’t already do enough, it also features 1920 x 1080 HD video capture with 64-step volume control and the ability to automatically split large video files for nearly 30 minutes of continuous recording. Our Conclusion: If you’re a photographer who shoots a wide range of topics, from documentary subjects to fashion to fast-moving cars, and you find yourself carrying around a lot of different kinds of cameras to shoot it with, the 1D X might just be the realization of all that collective wishful thinking for one pro camera that can cover...
4 Important Things to Know About Canon’s New 40mm Pancake Lens

4 Important Things to Know About Canon’s New 40mm Pancake Lens

1. Long History of a Short Lens What’s all the fuss surrounding Canon’s new 40mm “pancake” lens? So called because of their flat, short-barrel look, pancake lenses are primes made with thin glass and have been a convenient carry-along for photographers for over 100 years. They are an unobtrusive lens with aesthetic appeal, a longtime favorite in the mirrorless/Micro Four Thirds crowd. Canon has finally jumped on the bandwagon with its inaugural pancake: the EF 40mm f/2.8. 2. Better Focusing Distance and Bokeh Most pancakes fall into the normal-to-wide focal range and this one is no exception. While most, especially older, pancake lenses are unable to focus down on anything closer than 18 inches, this one is able to home in at a relatively close 11.8 inches. And with 7 diaphragm blades at f2.8, the bokeh on this lens is quite good. 3. STM Enables Video Auto Focusing on the Canon Rebel T4i This lens is certainly a great go-t0 for travelers looking to pack light, however, the technology of the 40mm is principally for video and will allow the camera to focus continuously while shooting video. The STM (STepping Motor) feature of this lens offers smooth and quiet continuous auto focusing when used with the video functionality of the new Canon Rebel T4i (for our review of the T4i, click here). 4. Why a 40mm Focal Length? But why 40mm’s? The focal length is certainly a bit of a novelty. The most commonly-found lengths for prime lenses are 35mm, 50mm, 85mm, and 100mm (with 24mm becoming a favorite as well). For some, it is just a matter of having a...
Tip of the Week: Use a Tilt-Shift Lens for Panoramic Photos

Tip of the Week: Use a Tilt-Shift Lens for Panoramic Photos

Every week, we post a photography-related tip on our blog. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. There are many ways to create panoramic images. You can start with a really wide-angle lens, then simply crop down to a long, narrow band to create a “faux” panorama. You can also use the built-in panoramic functions of cameras like Sony’s NEX and Alpha series, as well as Fuji’s X100 and X-Pro1. You can also simply take a series of pictures and stitch them together in Photoshop, or, if you’re really into panoramic photography, you could rent a pano-head from us, like the ones from Nodal Ninja. Today, we’re going to talk about one of my favorite ways to create panoramas. All of the methods above have some shortcomings that make it a bit harder to create good panos. Using a wide-angle lens and cropping, for example, leaves me with a lower-resolution file than I’d like. The built-in pano features in some cameras is neat, and I do use them (as shown in Figure 1), but they’re also relatively low-res JPEGs. Pano heads are great for this sort of work, but you have to find the “nodal point” of each lens you want to use, and that takes quite a bit of work. Tilt-shift lenses are a great alternative for creating panoramic images. Traditionally, these are used by architectural and landscape photographers to avoid distortion or...
Tip of the Week: Behold the Frankencam!

Tip of the Week: Behold the Frankencam!

The practice of swapping lenses between platforms via adapters isn’t something new. Back in October 2011, for example, we wrote about using Canon, Nikon, and Leica lenses with Micro 4/3 cameras. Similarly, you can use an adapter to mount Nikon lenses onto Canon cameras, but until recently, this was limited to a smaller subset of Nikon lenses. The “D” lenses from Nikon, the ones with manual aperture rings like the Nikon 35mm f/2, could be used via an adapter on Canon cameras. You could manipulate the aperture manually on the lens, and set the shutter speed on your camera. DSLR video shooters quickly took to these lenses for this very reason. However, Nikon’s “G” class of lenses couldn’t be used with those adapters as there was no way to control the aperture on them as they lacked a manual aperture ring. The aperture was controlled electronically from the camera itself, and Canon cameras could not communicate with the lens in order to do so. Enter the Nikon G Lens to Canon Camera adapter. This ingenious little device allows not only the mounting of a Nikon lens to a Canon camera (like the older adapter we carry for “D” lenses), but also lets you mount a “G” lens onto your Canon body – and gives you a way to control the lens’ aperture mechanically. If you look at the adapter itself, there are two blue tabs attached to it. Once the lens is attached to the adapter, those blue tabs move a small lever on the lens itself that opens and closes the aperture. Looking through the viewfinder on your...