Quick Tip on Blending Two Photos in Time Bracketing

Quick Tip on Blending Two Photos in Time Bracketing

Photographer Marc Muench took a compelling photo while out in Death Valley National Park. The sun is setting and it appears as if the night is rolling in at hyper speed, allowing the stars and clouds to shine through the still-bright sky. This image is, indeed, a composite but not so much a composite of completely different images–it is more of a composite of time. This simple technique is what Muench likes to call “Time Bracketing”. Capturing different exposures of the same scene and merging them together later is the basic concept behind High Dynamic Range photography. What makes Time Bracketing a little different is that it is allowing the time of day, rather than just in-camera settings, to dictate the exposure and scene for blending later. This is how Muench was able to get bright stars in the same frame as a bright setting sun and it is a nice way to get a very unique look in a nature photo while still staying true to the environment of the scene you are capturing. Check out his behind-the-scenes video to see just how he got this shot: Time Bracketing Thanks goes out to Marc Muench for letting us share this tip with our audience! Just getting started in landscape photography? Take the guesswork out of what to rent and try one of BorrowLenses.com’s Landscape Essentials packages, in both Canon and...
Quick Tip: Optimize Canon 5D Mark III Write Speeds – Avoid Using SD Cards

Quick Tip: Optimize Canon 5D Mark III Write Speeds – Avoid Using SD Cards

Buffer Sluggish on 5D Mark III? Ditch the SD Card! Photographer Jeff Cable discovered something interesting about the 5D Mark III when he was doing some high-speed shooting–it’s slow, but only under certain circumstances. His advice? Pass on using the SD slot if you happen to be writing the same image to both cards and care about clearing your buffer quickly: “…YOU DO NOT want to put a card in the SD slot. Why? Because, for some reason unbeknownst to me, Canon decided to build the 5D Mark III with one very fast CF slot which supports the newer UDMA7 protocol and a standard SD card slot which does NOT support the high speed standard (called UHS – for Ultra High Speed). This is really strange because many other cameras have come out with UHS1 compatible slots over the last year. Without UHS support, the top speed that can be achieved by the SD card is 133x. This is true even if you purchase a 600x SD card and insert it in the camera. The best you will get is 133x…” Why is this happening? The 5D Mark III defaults to the slowest card that is in the camera at the time. If you want to take full advantage of your professional CF card, leave the SD slot alone–save it for times when speed isn’t important but having backups or more storage is. On any camera with dual card slots (this includes pro bodies, such as the Canon 1D x and Nikon D4, as well as the Nikon D800 and Sony A99), it will default to the lowest card speed...
Tip of the Week: Understanding Sensor Crop Factors, Part 1

Tip of the Week: Understanding Sensor Crop Factors, Part 1

Every week, we post a photography-related tip on our blog. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. You’ve likely heard the term “Crop Sensor” before, and if you’re new to the world of digital photography, then you may only have a rudimentary understanding of what that means. In Part 1 of this series, we take a look at three different types of sensors and the practical effect they have on lens selection. In Part 2, we’ll take a look at what this means for depth of field, and that “bokeh” thing everyone’s talking about. What’s a “Crop Sensor” camera anyway? To understand what a “Crop Sensor” camera is, you first have to understand what a “Full Frame” sensor camera is, and that takes us back to the days of film photography. A piece of 35mm film measures approximately 36 x 24mm in size, and that’s the size of the sensor in “Full Frame” cameras like the Nikon D4 and the Canon 5D Mark III. Cameras with these sensors typically occupy the higher end of Canon, Nikon and Sony’s offerings, and are also among the most expensive DSLRs you can buy from them. All three manufacturers also make cameras with smaller chips. Nikon and Sony have cameras like the Nikon D7000 and the Sony A77 that have “APS-C”-sized sensors measuring 23.6 x 15.7mm. Canon’s APS-C sensor is a bit smaller, measuring 22.2 x 14.8mm. Canon...