Opinion: iBooks Author – why photographers should care

Opinion: iBooks Author – why photographers should care

Yesterday, at an event in New York, Apple released an update to its iBooks app, along with an all-new authoring application that makes it very easy to create stunning interactive books for the iPad. On the surface of things, this seemed to be an education-related event, with a focus on using the authoring tool, iBooks Author, to create textbooks for sale through the iBookstore. But if you watch the video of the special event, you’ll see that Phil Schiller, Apple’s VP of worldwide marketing, makes a point of mentioning that iBooks Author can be used to create much more than textbooks. This is where things start to get interesting. A few days ago, I posted the following rant to my Google+ page. I just had a bit of an epiphany. I’m reviewing a book for +This Week in Photo (TWiP) and I realized that I can’t really review it – or any other book – in terms of its design and presentation. This one book is available in three or four electronic formats, not one of them alike. How do you a review a book – especially a book on photography – without commenting on its design and layout? I think ebooks are going to have to get to a point where they match print books in terms of aesthetic beauty. Ebooks on photography, for example, really ought to match their printed counterparts. +David duChemin is doing this to a huge extent with his Craft and Vision ebooks, but the big publishers have to get up there and do this too. ePub is a lame format, as is the...
Tip of the week: Offloading your images quickly

Tip of the week: Offloading your images quickly

Every Thursday, we post a photography-related tip. These tips are inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. This week’s tip is inspired by something that we’ve heard asked many times; with today’s high resolution cameras, a 4GB, 8GB or even 16GB memory card may not be enough to hold all your images from a shoot, so you’ll need a safe way to offload the images and resume shooting.  Carrying multiple cards is always a good idea, but as anyone who’s dropped an SD memory card knows, those things are tiny and easy to lose. Replacing a lost card is easy. Replacing the images on it? Not so much. It’s also not always possible to offload the images to a laptop as well. So here’s our tip of the week: don’t let the lack of a computer prevent you from ensuring that your images are offloaded from your cards every night. We offer two great options for you to do this. The first is everyone’s favorite tablet, the Apple iPad. BorrowLenses.com rents the iPad 2 64GB WiFi edition and we send it to you with Apple’s Camera Connection kit so you can transfer images from your SD card directly to the iPad. If your camera uses CompactFlash cards, you can connect your camera to the iPad using the USB dongle (that’s part of the Camera Connection Kit) and transfer your images that way. The advantages of this method are clear...