Behind The Shot: Just Like A Dream

Behind The Shot: Just Like A Dream

Behind The Shot is a recurring feature where we dig deeper and find the backstories that accompany amazing photos. Do you have an awesome photo or know of one that we might want to feature? Send us an email!

Krystle Wright 14

Photographer: Krystle Wright

Gear: Canon EOS 5D MIII, Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM Lens580 EXII Flash

Settings: 24mm, 30sec @ f/4.5, ISO 400

Backstory: Highlining is an incredible sport that involves a strong mentality and of course balance. As I photographed high lining many times, I noticed the intricate movements especially with the arms to help maintain the balance and came up with this idea to strap L.E.D lights to Chris Rigby under a full moon. We were in Consumnes River George in Northern California. The high line is 237ft long titled ‘Just Like A Dream.’ The LED lights were quite bright in Chris’s face so it was a real challenge for him to focus. I would’ve used my pocket wizard to fire the flash though in the darkness, I misplaced a cable so instead I had a friend, Ryan Robinson to press the test button on the flash to pop it off. To get the focus sharp, I had Chris stand where I knew I wanted the flash to hit him and pre set the focus and the rest was a test of patience. No doubt I needed a tripod and I used a trigger to avoid camera shake.

I’m really pleased that this photo turned out the way it did as it’s always challenging to come up with new ideas or concepts to show the sport in a different way.

Also be sure to check out this recent feature article on Krystle.

Check out more of Krystle’s work on her website and Facebook page.

If you like this photo be sure to share it! Do you have an awesome photo or know of one that we might want to feature? Send us an email!

5 Important Photography Business Tips to Start the Year Off Right

5 Important Photography Business Tips to Start the Year Off Right

The holidays are prime season for getting new cameras and lenses. It is also when photographers take stock of their images as well as their income and expenses. Here are 5 important recourses for any business-minded photographer, whether you’re a seasoned shooter looking to hone your business skills or a complete novice who wants to get a jump start on organizing their future.


Never Shoot for Free

In this interview with freelance photographer Court Leve, you’ll discover how important it is to find financial value in your work as well as artistic value.

Register Your Gear

Insuring your camera equipment is essential but did you know you can also register it for free? Register your serials online with Lenstag and it will send out indexed alerts in the unfortunate event that your gear gets stolen. read more…

Behind The Shot: Above the Bar

Behind The Shot: Above the Bar

Behind The Shot is a recurring feature where we dig deeper and find the backstories that accompany amazing photos. Do you have an awesome photo or know of one that we might want to feature? Send us an email!

Sports_Port_1300px-53

Photographer: Scott Roeder

Gear: Nikon D3sNikon 400mm f/2.8D AF-S, Monopod

Settings: ISO 320, f/2.8, 1/6400

Backstory: Track and field is among my favorite sports to shoot. There are plenty of different individual events, the athletes are amazing, and the opportunities for making a creative image are endless. It also gives me a great chance to work on shooting tight and challenging myself.

I wanted a clean background so I chose to shoot sitting on the ground and as close as possible, while still being able to capture the high jumpers full body within the frame. Usually my camera is set to a single focus point in the center for increased focusing response, and AI SERVO so that I can track my subjects. After a few shots I noticed two issues, first that I had empty space at the top of the frame and that the high jumpers feet were getting cut off, and secondly that my focus had jumped to the bar. Tracking the athletes as they made their approach to the bar and keeping my focus on their face led to the framing being off, and the quick focus of the D3s allowed the focus to switch when the bar crossed the center focus point. To fix both of these issues, I decided to manually focus roughly 8-10 inches in front of the bar, where I knew I wanted to catch the high jumpers at their peak. Having the focus preset also allowed me to concentrate on getting the whole body of the athletes in the frame. The expression, body position, and clean background really made this image a keeper for me!

Scott lives in the San Francisco Bay Area and shoots weddings, sports, portraits, products, or anything else you throw at him.

Check out more of Scott’s work on his website.

If you like this photo be sure to share it! Do you have an awesome photo or know of one that we might want to feature? Send us an email!

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