Time Lapsing Against the Clock: How to Shoot a Time Lapse with a Stadium Full of Warriors Fans

Time Lapsing Against the Clock: How to Shoot a Time Lapse with a Stadium Full of Warriors Fans

Matt Maniego, a freelance filmmaker and photographer based in San Francisco, was recently asked to document the promotional efforts of NBA’s Golden State Warriors. His specialty time lapse work has been featured by the San Francisco Giants, the 49ers, and the Golden State Warriors, as well as the Pac-12 Network, Comcast SportsNet, and the NFL Network, just to name a few. Here he takes us along for the ride and shares his tips for getting the perfect time lapse. Time Lapsing Against the Clock by Matt Maniego At this very moment, Oracale Arena, aka ‘Roaracle’, is not just audibly the loudest arena in the NBA but is also visually. A sea of bright yellow t-shirts cover each and every seat in the house and I have been asked to capture how these yellow shirts made it from the boxes, to the seats, and eventually onto 20,000 Warrior fans. BEHIND THE SCENES My team and I had 4 hours to capture the evolution of the promo shirts. With that large an area I split my team into two, with one remaining to capture the behind-the-scenes footage. Our main goal was to capture captivating time lapses. To accomplish this feat under pressure we brought with us: Canon 5D Mark III Canon 5D Mark II Canon 6D Canon 7D Canon 16-35 f2.8L II Canon 24-70 f2.8L II Rokinon 14mm f2.8 Emotimo TB3 Dynamic Perceptions Stage Zero Dolly Dynamic Perceptions Stage One Dolly Induro AT413 Tripods x 5 Fancier Ballheads x 5 64GB Compact Flash x 5 Canon Remote Trigger (for backup) If you’re not familiar with time lapse lingo, the rigs you see in the above video are “Motion...
Lightroom CC/6 Latest Features: Panoramas, Masking, and More

Lightroom CC/6 Latest Features: Panoramas, Masking, and More

Explore the latest new Lightroom features in this guest post by journalist and adventure photographer Jay Goodrich. Be sure to check out Goodrich’s other great tutorials below: • 5 Features for Adobe Lightroom 5 • Exposure Blending Using Adobe Photoshop CS6 • Diffraction and Focus Stacking Tutorial for Photoshop CS6 Lightroom CC/6 Latest Features: Panoramas, Masking, and More by Jay Goodrich Adobe released its newest version of Lightroom; it is now known as Lightroom CC or Lightroom 6 depending on how you purchase the software. Lightroom CC is available in Adobe’s Creative Cloud and will continuously be updated from now and into the foreseeable future. If you decide the Creative Cloud isn’t for you, you can still purchase Lightroom 6 in software box form from a reseller like B and H Photo Video. The downside to this purchase method, however, is that Adobe doesn’t have plans at this point to update the non-cloud version down the road. This is pretty much the key decision you’ll need to make as to the direction you think your needs will take you regarding your photo editing software. We have had our entire office on the Creative Cloud for close to two years at this point, and have zero complaints with the ease of keeping everything up to date. At the release of Lightroom CC, Creative Cloud clients had the software available for download immediately upon Adobe’s announcement of it. In the last week I have truly put this software through its paces. An image file submission to Powder Magazine had us not only processing images, but also adding all of their required metadata to...
10 Sports Photography Gear Tips

10 Sports Photography Gear Tips

Gear never matters more than when you’re out shooting sports. It is one of the most difficult things to capture well and takes years of practice. Whether you’re aiming high or just want better after-school action candids, here are 10 home run gear tips to kick off the sunny season. These are aimed for beginners but are great reminders for seasoned pros. Get Your Best Shot of the Season with These 10 Sports Photography Gear Tips 1. Use a Low Profile Tripod for a Heroic Look 2. Beat the Sun with LCD Loops and Electronic Viewfinders 3. Use Cameras with Back Focus Buttons 4. Use Cameras Above 6 FPS with Continuous Modes 5. Don’t Sweat Over Image Stabilization 6. Set Up Remote Cameras for Better Angles 7. Experiment with Rear Curtain Sync Flash for Motion Effects 8. Push/Pull vs Two Touch Lenses: Discover What’s Right for You 9. Lighten Your Load with Smaller Aperture Telephotos or Extenders 10. Stay Out All Day with Protected Gear Bonus Tip: Ways to Show Action with Blur Use a Low Profile Tripod for a Heroic Look If your sports shots look a little flat, get down for a new perspective. While shooting from below is a general no-no for people photography, in sports it makes players look heroic. If ergonomics are a worry, support yourself with a specialized low profile/small footprint tripod, like the Induro tabletop tripod, which can carry up to 220 lbs while weighing less than 5 lbs! Beat the Sun with LCD Loops and Electronic Viewfinders Reviewing images in the bright sun can be an act of suffering. Screen covers or “loops” help you better see what you’re working with. Sometimes they...
Your Gear Guide for Better Wedding Photography

Your Gear Guide for Better Wedding Photography

Find your perfect match in time for your next (or first) big wedding shoot. Many of you are probably worried about not bringing the right equipment with you. We have thousands of items for you to rent but only certain items are ideal for weddings. This list will help you narrow it down to just the essentials to fit your shooting style. Take note of these 10 tips that will help you complete your skills. Ten Gear Tips for a Better Wedding Day Photography Workflow: 1. Zoom with a View: Using Long Focal Lengths 2. Safety in Numbers: Spring for a Second Body 3. Fall in Love with Battery Grips 4. Something Borrowed, Something Blue: Mixing Artificial with Natural Lighting 5. Enjoy the Silence: Quiet Shutter Options 6. Portable Prowess 7. N+1 Yourself: Using Dual Memory Cards 8. Up Close and Personal: Macro Lenses 9. Practice Mindfulness: Gear Security 10. Going Slim to Win: Consider Mirrorless Zoom with a View: Using Long Focal Lengths Longer lenses tend to keep your subject’s facial features in proper proportion, which is more flattering. There are a couple of fast telephoto zooms we rent that allow you to shoot with a wide-open aperture for a very pleasing out-of-focus background without sacrificing the convenience of being able to shoot at a variety of lengths. Plus, having a longer lens means you have to stand further from your subject. Sometimes this allows the couple to relax a little bit and act more naturally for their portrait. We Recommend: • Canon 70-200mm f/2.8 IS II • Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VR II • Sony 70-200mm f/2.8G SSM II for Sony A Mount • Olympus 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO for...
Planning for Safari: Photography Tips and Tricks

Planning for Safari: Photography Tips and Tricks

It’s safe to say that an African safari is on most wildlife photographers’ destination wish list. It is a trip many will never get the chance to do due to the extensive travel and time requirements as well as the significant financial expense. However, for those lucky enough to set out on the incredible journey it’s not as simple as picking a destination, hotel, and plane ticket. There is a significant amount of preparation and planning that must be done ahead of time. Borrowlenses.com advocate and wildlife photographer David Bernstein recently returned from his epic safari trip and graciously shared a few tips he learned along the way. Bernstein started out using a humble Rebel series camera and over time grew into being what he calls a “photo-naturalist”, taking pictures of landscapes and wildlife with an affinity for birds. This article is meant to help you plan for an African photo-focused safari and address many of the things to consider before embarking on the journey of a lifetime. Planning for Safari: Photography Tips and Tricks by David Bernstein Travel Agents for the Win If this is your first safari then do not plan it by yourself! There are many highly-rated travel companies that specialize in organizing African safaris. Their goal is to provide you with an unbelievable experience tailored to what you want and hope to see. I always felt comfortable planning my own itineraries on photo excursions because of all my previous travel experience, however, I decided to use a travel company to plan and organize my first safari and I wouldn’t have done it any other way. They guided...
Photography Tips: Getting the Perfect Ski Shot

Photography Tips: Getting the Perfect Ski Shot

Ian Coble is a commercial sports photographer based in Seattle, WA. His imagery and style have been used in campaigns for Patagonia, Columbia, Atlas Snowshoes, Brooks Running, Smith Optics, Cascade Designs, Red Bull and many others. Below he shares his tips for getting the perfect snow sports shot. Photography Tips: Getting the Perfect Ski Shot by Ian Coble Taking photos on your adventures can be incredibly rewarding but it can also be incredibly frustrating. You spend all day shooting your friends on an amazing outing and come home eager to look at your work. But as you review your images you find that they’re blurry, underexposed, or just plain boring—definitely not the way that you remember the excitement of the day. This tutorial will help you minimize those frustrations with some tech tips to follow the next time you take your camera on a ski or snowboard outing. Continue on for some expert advice just in time for the spring skiing season (and an unexpected dump in Tahoe)! Communicate Your Plan The number one piece of advice I can offer is to plan your shots and communicate that plan to whomever you’re shooting. Just having someone ski down past you while you snap photos is a quick way to guarantee sub-par shots. Talk to your subject before you have them ski down. Tell them what you’re looking for and your chances of getting a shot will drastically go up. Granted, this takes more time and some subjects may get frustrated by the delays. But if you’re after amazing photos, it’s absolutely required. I’ve never had an athlete complain about the...