Canon Rebel SL1 Impressions

Canon Rebel SL1 Impressions

Having been exposed to the most lusted after, review topping gear such as the 1DX and super telephoto lenses on a daily basis, a person tends to start looking for interesting gear experiences with less common choices. Take the Rebel SL1, for example (yes, we ARE aware of the huge gap in performance expectations). We have been using this body for some time now behind-the-scenes and despite its undesirable plastic build, tiny pentamirror viewfinder, and ridiculously small size, we started to um…like it! Here is why we would recommend trying this body out the next time you are considering something new for casual everyday shooting, travel photography, portraits, or landscapes. Light as A Feather With battery, memory card, and strap included, the camera weighs in at about 1 lb. It pairs extremely well with a smallish telephoto such as the 70-200mm f/4L IS, tipping the scale at a bit under 2.5 lbs. That is an absolute featherweight in the world of DSLRs and puts absolutely no toll on your body after a day of shooting. Capacitive Touch Screen Change your focus point, alter your exposure settings, and review your images all using the touch screen. This all makes a lot of sense on a camera this small! There is also a dedicated ISO button located on the top of the panel. Hit that button, touch the setting you want on the LCD, and go. It’s Still a DSLR Mirrorless cameras are the technology of the future. However, there are some pretty good reasons why not to make the complete changeover yet. Continuous autofocus is a good reason to stick with DSLRs for...
The New Nikon D5500

The New Nikon D5500

Nikon’s newest iteration of their entry level DSLR, the D5500, has just been added to the inventory here at Borrowlenses.com! Jonathan Fleming, manager of the VIP department, took it for a whirl and for its size and stature was impressed by its capabilities. Continue reading to find out his full review! Beginning with the overall stats of the camera, the D5500 sports a 24 megapixel sensor with no AA filter. The disappearance of the AA filter (Ant-Aliasing) makes for sharper images and more captured fine detail in those images. There is a 39 point focus system, 9 of  which are cross-type, allowing for a better chance of locking on to changes in contrast. The more cross points you have, the more effective. You also get up to 5fps when burst shooting! This entry level camera has come a long way from its predecessors (d5100, d5200, d5300)! The grip is ergonomically designed, making it easy to hold despite its small frame. The rear command dial has been moved to the top deck, where the thumb rests more naturally on a camera of this size. The weight of this body has also decreased 60g from the cameras it replaces – a plus for those trying to keep their weight down and quality up. Nikon has finally added a capacitive articulating touch screen, similar to the beloved Canon SL1. You can pinch to zoom, swipe through photos, and select settings/focus points all from the touch screen. The thing to consider, like with most new camera body releases, is that RAW files are yet to be supported by third party editors such as...
Canon 70D – Continuous Autofocus With STM Lenses

Canon 70D – Continuous Autofocus With STM Lenses

Have you ever tried to autofocus in Live View with a DSLR? Pretty crummy, right? The Canon 70D changes that a bit with what they call Dual Pixel CMOS AF. This fairly new technology allows smooth, continuous autofocus (Canon calls is Movie Servo AF) while recording video. Continue on to view the test footage recorded when paired with Canon’s STM lenses. You may also be wondering what STM stands for in all these newly released Canon lenses! It stands for STepping Motor and it is the newest technology developed by Canon to better enable smooth video capture. Lenses designed with STM technology produce super smooth continuous autofocus even while shooting video. In addition, STM lenses are silent, eliminating traditional AF noise that was known to creep into video. We took the 24-105mm STM lens out to gather some example footage to share with you. Overall the AF tracks pretty well and pulls smoothly. Combined with the 70D, the AF experience is much more camcorder-like than what is the norm shooting with DSLRs. So there you have it! An easy solution to shoot some basic video, especially if you are just breaking in and would like a good head start into the popular world of DSLR video production. Incidentally, you can also take advantage of the Dual Pixel CMOS AF technology in the new Canon 7D Mark ll. Let us know your feedback and how you enjoyed this setup or what you would recommend in the comments...
5 Quick Tips for Shooting with the Atomos Shogun

5 Quick Tips for Shooting with the Atomos Shogun

We recently received the Atomos Shogun external monitor/recorder, a bit of gear a lot of customers have been eager to work with for some time now. We’re currently putting it through its paces and will have sample footage for you soon, but for now, we thought we’d put together a few tips and tricks that we’ve found useful when shooting with the Atomos Shogun. 1. Audio If you’ve got something like a Rode Videomic Pro plugged into your camera and intend to have the Shogun record the audio off that, you need to make sure the Shogun is set to do so. On the bottom-left corner of the Shogun’s screen is a small icon representing incoming audio (highlighted in red here). Tap that to bring it up, then make sure that the “Rec” button is a bright red next to the audio channel you want to record. If you’re not seeing any activity in your intended channel, check your camera; audio recording might be turned off. 2. Ensure clean HDMI output Cameras like the A7s can output not just the video signal to the Shogun, but also the on-screen menus – which will get recorded along with your intended footage. Make sure you turn those off!   3. Lock your screen Once you start recording, you can press the power button once on the shogun to lock the screen. This prevents any accidental touches from registering on the touch screen. You can also change a setting in the Shogun to power the screen down when you lock it, and save that use for in-between shots to save battery life. 4. Touch...
Industry Info: Our Favorite Infographics from 2014

Industry Info: Our Favorite Infographics from 2014

As resolutions begin to wane, now is a good time to look back at 2014 and glean some instructive trends in photography and videography from the past year. Here are some of our favorite infographics, charts, and general industry knowledge from 2014: DSLR & Digital Camera vs Smartphone Photography from Treat.com Phone shooting is on the rise and DSLR sales are sluggish – that’s not news – but the numbers are still interesting. Click the image to see the entire infographic from its original source. Camera ownership on Flickr: 2013-2014 This series of graphs shows brand popularity from last year. All we can say is…poor Pentax. Click graphic below for more. What Gear is Stolen Most and Where You’re Most Likely to Get Robbed from Lenstag.com (via PetaPixel) Shows exactly what the title says. Be careful on your next trip to Italy…click the graphic to see the rest. Here’s 2013’s, too. Occupational Employment and Wages from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics Still waiting on 2014’s report but nothing has likely changed much from this 2013 report. See the entire report by clicking the graphic below. We Experiment On Human Beings! OkCupid’s Massive User Picture Data This is an excuse to list an old set of graphs from 2010 because they still prove to be strange and fascinating. OkCupid’s analysis of its users teaches all of us something (even if that something is shame). The Top 30 Most Socially Influential Photographers from eyefi This is probably the silliest collection of anything in the photography world from 2014 but, hey, BorrowLenses’ own Jim Goldstein made the list and it was way too...
The Sony FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS Lens is Ready for Your Next Video Shoot

The Sony FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS Lens is Ready for Your Next Video Shoot

We have a new cine lens for rent – the FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS. It’s ideal for both the Sony FS7 and the Sony a7S but will mount on any E mount camera. It is ideal for run-and-gun style shooting, documentary filmmaking, and any other cinematic use where portability is important. Here are some features that really stand out about this lens and why should you shoot with it. Focal Length: 28 – 135mm. Versatile range that prevents you from having to change lenses. Maximum Aperture: f/4. Fast enough for most low-light and out-of-focus needs. Designed for full frame Sony E mount cameras. Pair this with Sony’s a7 line. Compatible with crop sensor E Mount cameras. Pair this with the FS700, FS7, or any E mount camera. 1.31′ Minimum Focusing Distance. Relatively close range for a lens reaching up to 135mm. Auto Focus with Manual Focus Override. Fine-tune your focusing without using an AF/MF switch. Image Stabilization (Optical SteadyShot, or OSS). Allows you to gain more stops without sacrificing sharpness when shooting at lower shutter speeds. Super Sonic wave Motor. Silent autofocusing – essential for video. The FE PZ 28-135mm f/4 G OSS is light weight and partially manufactured with polycarbonate, making this lens more impact resistant and also better protected from the sun. It also helps save on weight. You can select between clicked and de-clicked aperture for ultimate control. Having a de-clicked aperture makes it great for run-and-gun shooting and adjusting exposure mid-take like when there is a major shift in exposure walking from indoor to outdoor lighting. This lens was designed side-by-side with the FS7, which boasts internal firmware to correct for aberrations, making this lens...