Latest Gear at BorrowLenses – June Edition

Latest Gear at BorrowLenses – June Edition

We’re feeling like standing outside the door of our San Carlos or Waltham headquarters and yelling, “New gear! Get your new gear! Fresh off the FedEx truck, new gear!” Since our bosses ruled that out, we’re taking to the blog to tell you about all the cool toys we just got in. Without further ado, here’s some of the latest gear to rent at BorrowLenses. Rokinon 135mm T/2.2 Cine DS lens for Canon We love the Rokinon Cine primes. They’re a fraction of the cost of a Canon or Zeiss cine prime to rent, and while those lenses have unsurpassed optical properties and other great qualities going for them, the Cine DS line from Rokinon still has a certain soft spot that calls to the small indie startup we once were. The 135mm from Rokinon has the same great characteristics that the rest of the Cine DS line has: small size, solid optics, and a de-clicked aperture that allows for smooth transitions from wide open to stopped down all the way. Furthermore, the gears for the focus and aperture rings are in the same place for all the lenses in the Cine DS series, making it easier to swap lenses on a rig without repositioning follow focus gears, etc. Canon 50mm f/1.8 STM Speaking of great lenses, the “nifty fifty” from Canon hasn’t changed much for, well, ever. Until now. The new iteration of this lens has the STM, or stepping motor focus system that is slowly making its way into Canon’s autofocus lenses. The STM allows for whisper-quiet autofocus and smooth and precise movements when shooting video. Pair...
Time Lapsing Against the Clock: How to Shoot a Time Lapse with a Stadium Full of Warriors Fans

Time Lapsing Against the Clock: How to Shoot a Time Lapse with a Stadium Full of Warriors Fans

Matt Maniego, a freelance filmmaker and photographer based in San Francisco, was recently asked to document the promotional efforts of NBA’s Golden State Warriors. His specialty time lapse work has been featured by the San Francisco Giants, the 49ers, and the Golden State Warriors, as well as the Pac-12 Network, Comcast SportsNet, and the NFL Network, just to name a few. Here he takes us along for the ride and shares his tips for getting the perfect time lapse. Time Lapsing Against the Clock by Matt Maniego At this very moment, Oracale Arena, aka ‘Roaracle’, is not just audibly the loudest arena in the NBA but is also visually. A sea of bright yellow t-shirts cover each and every seat in the house and I have been asked to capture how these yellow shirts made it from the boxes, to the seats, and eventually onto 20,000 Warrior fans. BEHIND THE SCENES My team and I had 4 hours to capture the evolution of the promo shirts. With that large an area I split my team into two, with one remaining to capture the behind-the-scenes footage. Our main goal was to capture captivating time lapses. To accomplish this feat under pressure we brought with us: Canon 5D Mark III Canon 5D Mark II Canon 6D Canon 7D Canon 16-35 f2.8L II Canon 24-70 f2.8L II Rokinon 14mm f2.8 Emotimo TB3 Dynamic Perceptions Stage Zero Dolly Dynamic Perceptions Stage One Dolly Induro AT413 Tripods x 5 Fancier Ballheads x 5 64GB Compact Flash x 5 Canon Remote Trigger (for backup) If you’re not familiar with time lapse lingo, the rigs you see in the above video are “Motion...
Leverage Multiple Camera Platforms with Adapters

Leverage Multiple Camera Platforms with Adapters

Recently, I completed a shoot for an article written by our own Alex Huff for 500px’s ISO blog. For it, I returned to my trusty old 5D Mark II and an even older lens: a Nikon 100mm f/2.8 AiS lens that’s at least 30 years old. For me, the results were well past what I’d expected from the setup. To marry that Nikon lens to my 5D Mark II, I used this Nikon G lens to Canon adapter. I added a lens hood I own to the setup to avoid some glare I was getting off an overhead light and this is what it looked like: As I said, the results were well past what I’d expected. Turns out, that lens was superb on my 5D and the shot of model Xela Gaerlan (below) that ended up on the blog is one of my favorites. Now, this isn’t the first time I’ve used a Nikon lens on my 5D. In fact, I wrote about this a couple of years ago. Moreover, I’ve also written in the past about using multiple lens types on Micro 4/3 cameras too. When I looked at my shooting kit now, however, I felt like it was time to visit the topic once more, especially given how much the adapter market has evolved. I own a 5D Mark II and a Sony a7S. When it comes to lenses, however, I own one Canon 50mm f/1.8 lens (which I never use) and five Nikon-mount lenses. I had a Canon 24–70 at some point, but it’s lying at the bottom of the San Francisco Bay near the...
Latest Gear at BorrowLenses – May Edition

Latest Gear at BorrowLenses – May Edition

The pace of gear releases in our industry seems to be constantly increasing these days. Every month, we have new photo or video gear coming into our offices so we thought we’d start putting together a roundup of everything new we have available to rent. Here’s what’s come in during the last month or so: Profoto B2 AirTTL Location Kit   Profoto gear just keeps getting better and better. The guys over at Resource Mag Online have put up a nice video review that you can check out here, but here’s the short and sweet: It’s Profoto’s legendary quality meets portability meets TTL metering for Canon and Nikon shooters. You can, of course, also hook up your standard PocketWizards for manual triggering as well. This is a fantastic light for location shooting when you want a bit more power than a standard speedlight. Elinchrom 800W/s D-Lite RX4 Monolight Kit   Since we’re on the subject of lighting, the guys at Elinchrom haven’t been standing still either. We now have one of their newest lights in stock, and it’s available as a kit that comes with light stands, small softboxes, and the Skyport SPEED transmitter for triggering these flashes. We love these lights, and you can pair them with Elinchrom’s legendary Deep Octa or 6′ Light Bank for some incredible lighting. Fuji XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR Lens Fuji keeps making waves with their incredible line of X-series cameras and lenses, but this particular one is really the one Fuji shooters have been waiting for. The equivalent of a 24-82.5mm lens on a full-frame camera, this zoom is weather-sealed...
First Impressions of the Canon 11-24mm f/4

First Impressions of the Canon 11-24mm f/4

All sorts of adjectives have been used to describe the new Canon 11-24mm f/4 lens recently announced at the top of 2015. World’s widest rectilinear lens, best of its kind, unheard of, the ultimate in wide-angle photography, etc. Borrowlenses.com received its first shipment from Canon and eagerly took it for a spin. Read on to find out what we thought of the much-hyped Canon 11-24mm f/4 lens. With all this lens has to offer, it’s best to start with its inherent design. First and foremost it is the newest addition to Canon’s professional L series lenses and fills the gap as the widest angle rectilinear zoom lens offered by any lens manufacturer at this time. It boasts a 126° angle of view at its widest (11mm), with a fixed maximum aperture of f/4 throughout the full focal range of ultra-wide to standard angle of view. According to Canon, the Canon 11-24mm f/4 is designed with the largest lens element made [3/12/15], measuring in at an 87mm diameter. Additional 3 glass elements make up the lens as well as Ultra-low Dispersion and Super UD lens elements to reduce chromatic aberration and minimize distortion throughout the focal range. Similar to the other L series lenses, multiple lens element coatings have also been integrated to optimize contrast in the final image. Canon has suggested this lens is best suited for architecture, interior design, and landscapes due to its minimal distortion. Typically lenses of this width distort straight lines, making them appear curved if composed outside of the sweet spot of the frame. This distortion, however, is significantly reduced with Canon’s technological advancements when designing...
Atomos Shogun First Impressions

Atomos Shogun First Impressions

A couple of weeks ago, we posted a few tips for folks shooting with the Atomos Shogun external monitor/recorder. I’ve had some time to put my unit through a few shoots and have some first impressions to share. Look and Feel Some folks have commented on the fact that the Shogun feels a bit cheap in terms of build quality, especially compared to the other big 4K recorder, the Odyssey 7Q. While it’s true that the Shogun definitely has a somewhat plasticky feel to it, I actually appreciated the weight savings. This thing is going to live on top of my Sony A7s, attached either with a shoe-mount ballhead or a magic arm. Add to that the fact that I use a pretty heavy Sony battery with my kit and the weight savings from going with a plastic body are even more appreciated. The plastic doesn’t bother me at all; the unit still feels solid enough for daily use, though I’m not about to subject it to a drop test. Moreover, I love the hard Pelican case that Atomos ship with this thing. It’s got cutouts for everything that comes with the Shogun, along with extra cutouts for more batteries. Features I have to say, I’m impressed with the featureset. The fact that it shoots 4K is enough of a party trick, but Atomos have packed it full of a lot of other features. From peaking and zebras to false color and vectorscopes, the Shogun is a full-featured video monitor that I’ve now come to rely on even when I don’t shoot 4K. I love having the ProRes codec (even...