In-Camera Time-Lapse Photography Resource and Guide

In-Camera Time-Lapse Photography Resource and Guide

Fast-disappearing are the days of having to have a separate interval timer to create time-lapses. Many cameras now have built-in intervalometers. The following is a guide to setting up the time-lapse function for most cameras. 1. What is a Time-Lapse? 2. What Gear Do I Need for a Time-Lapse? 3. Notable Cameras with Built-in Interval Timers 4. What Settings Do I Need for a Time-Lapse? 5. For How Long Should I Make My Time-Lapse? 6. Time-Lapse Instructions By Camera 7. How to Put Together Your Time-Lapse What is a Time-Lapse? Time-lapses are comprised of a bunch of pictures of the same thing taken over a long period of time. You then display them quickly in sequence when you’re done. The result is a little “movie” that displays a slow passage of time quickly. Time-lapses are a great way to show how a kid grows, how a flower dies, how stadiums fill up, how the weather changes, and even how the Earth rotates! Most of time, though, you just want to show something simple made interesting, like the sun setting rapidly or the bustle of traffic. Time-lapses also make good scene fillers for larger visual projects. Pay attention and you’ll start noticing them everywhere, from the credits of TV shows to commercials and music videos. What Gear Do I Need for a Time-Lapse? Before we get into interval sequencing, it is important to understand some basic fundamentals of time-lapse photography. Consistency is key. You will need the following: • A tripod or other very stable environment. • A lens with manual focus. • Distance from random light sources (for example, don’t turn your...
3 Things That Are Annoying About The Sony FS7

3 Things That Are Annoying About The Sony FS7

San Francisco-based freelance filmmaker and photographer Matt Maniego recently had the opportunity to see how the new Sony FS7 would stand up to the standard of his professional shooting needs. His films have been featured by the three major Bay Area professional sports teams and his requirements are high quality RAW recording and relatively lightweight rigs for his run-and-gun shooting style. Here he breaks down why the Sony FS7 may be the camera he’s been waiting for…but is perhaps not perfect yet! Read on to see if the the Sony FS7 is the camera for you. 3 Things That Are Annoying About The Sony FS7 by Matt Maniego I’ve shot on many cameras before, including the Canon 5D Mark III, Canon C300, Sony FS700, RED Scarlet/Dragon, Black Magic Cinema/4K Production. You name it, I’ve probably shot on it. But none of them had all of the features I wanted at an appealing price point…until now. When I was hired to document the Golden State Warriors championship run I wanted a camera that was lightweight, easy to use, and shot 4K/SlowMo internally. Borrowlenses suggested I try the Sony FS7. I had read many great reviews about it and it did suit my needs well. The good outweigh the bad, so I’ll start with what I really liked about shooting with the Sony FS7. Benefit 1: SLog3 This alone is probably the best part about shooting on the Sony FS7. The ability to capture so much detail on a compressed codec is amazing! The camera captures plenty of detail in highlights and shadows that’s on par with much more expensive cameras. It’s definitely not RAW, but it’s also not a bajillion gigabytes per minute (if any...
Latest Gear at BorrowLenses – July Edition

Latest Gear at BorrowLenses – July Edition

Canon finally has an affordable 4K camera, Tokina’s got some cool Cine zooms for you, and we have the latest addition to the Leica family. It’s that time of the month again folks: here’s the July edition of all the fresh new gear at BorrowLenses! Hive Lighting Wasp Plasma PAR Light Kit Plasma lighting is catching on big-time these days. These kits from Hive Lighting draw relatively little power and, according to Hive, output the equivalent of 400–4,000 watt HMI lamps. Best of all, they have adjustable color temperatures and intensity, giving you a range of between 4,600K to 7,000K. Depending on the accessories you mount, they can put out a blistering 5,000 foot-candles of power at 10 feet. Doing the math, that’s… let’s see… carry the one… a lot of f-stops. Really. The Wasp Par kit comes with one par light, 4 lenses to give you a variety of lighting options, a set of scrims and barn doors. SmallHD Sidewider EVF We recently got the SmallHD 502 monitor into our inventory, and this flip-out frame and loupe is the perfect compliment to that monitor. It mounts – somewhat counterintuitively at first – sideways to the frame, which actually allows you to place the monitor parallel to your camera and gives you more of a run-and-gun-style add-on, which documentary filmmakers will appreciate. Interestingly, unlike other EVF/loupes, this one moves the monitor away from in front of your face, providing you with better situational awareness of your environment. The unit rents with the EVF loupe, a diopter assembly that lets you adjust it from –2 to +4, and a carrying...
Going Long On a Budget: The Tamron 150-600mm Telephoto Lens

Going Long On a Budget: The Tamron 150-600mm Telephoto Lens

I’m kind of a big fan of Canon and Nikon’s long glass. More than once I’ve taken either Nikon’s 800mm or 600mm lenses with a fast body, or Canon’s 600mm. On these occasions my subjects are usually birds and often birds in flight, as they tend to challenge even the best gear out there. This time I chose to take out something a little more budget-friendly and less bulky: the Tamron 150–600mm f/5–6.3 Di VC USD lens in the Nikon mount. The following is my impression of the quality of this lens. Build Quality Tamron’s past lenses have felt somewhat chintzy to me in the past. I own an old 28–75mm lens that had the fit and finish of a cheap kit lens. I’d come to associate them with lenses of that sort; inexpensive, plasticky, and far from high-end. Like Sigma, however, Tamron seems to be working through a bit of a reinvention. Their 24–70mm f/2.8 lens is still the only lens covering that focal length and maximum aperture with optical image stabilization made by any manufacturer. It’s actually an optically sound piece of glass with a far better build quality than I’d expected. The 150–600mm lens has a similarly surprising solidity and heft to it. Gone are the creaks and clicks I remember from my brief encounter with their 200mm–500mm lens; this one feels solid enough to almost feel like a Sigma lens — and I mean that as a compliment. The barrel is plastic with a slightly textured finish, while the focus and zoom rings are ridged rubber. Both rings move smoothly and firmly; they feel neither...
Swap out That Wide Angle Lens for Your Landscape Photography

Swap out That Wide Angle Lens for Your Landscape Photography

Landscape shooters love their wide-angle lenses. From the amazing Nikon 14–24mm f/2.8 to the new Canon 11–24mm f/4, it’s usually the wides that get everyone excited about landscape photography. Every so often, however, it pays to change things up. I was in the same boat when it came to landscapes; I reached for the Nikon 14–24mm often, even when I was using my Canon 5D Mark II. Then one day, tired of going for wide, sweeping landscapes, I decided to switch things up. Here are three ways you can do the same. Go Long but Not Too Long Sweeping panoramas are awesome and, back in 2012, I used a slightly different method to create a couple of images that I still look at and like today. In the image below I went with a “normal” length lens – the Canon 45mm f/2.8 Tilt-Shift lens. This is a composite of two shots, one with the lens shifted left, and one with it shifted right. Going with that normal perspective allowed me to avoid the one effect of wide-angle lenses that I don’t like: the tendency to often miniaturize things unless you’re pretty close to the subject (in which case they can distort things a bit). I also wanted some compression in the perspective and if you look at the image at 100% even in its current downsized version, you’ll see that you can read the words “Honneur et Patrie” on the far wall of the courtyard just fine. I wanted that tiny bit of detail, as well as Rodin’s “The Thinker” statue framed and recognizable by those pillars behind it. That...
Lightweight Hiking and Travel Alternatives

Lightweight Hiking and Travel Alternatives

Guest contributor Mark Shastany comes to us from the Borrowlenses.com VIP department to share his gear knowledge with the BL community! Shastany is a Boston-based photographer specializing in portraiture, commercial work, and landscape. He recently took a trip to the Catskills, NY and needed a lightweight solution that matched his personal standard of quality output. Mark graciously shared what he chose to bring, why, and what in hindsight he’d consider amending to make his kit more efficient and lightweight for next time! Lightweight Hiking and Travel Alternatives by Mark Shastany For Hiking and travel, you are often limited by the weight and size of the gear you choose to bring. In a scenario like this, there is often a sacrifice to be considered when attempting pro-grade images that are traditionally accomplished with large, heavy lenses and DSLR bodies. However, there are viable alternatives that work out nicely, cutting down on size and weight without compromising image quality. On a recent hike in the Catskills in New York, I performed a field test to find out what worked well for lightweight, high quality hiking alternatives – and what didn’t. Mirrorless systems provide great solutions to the age-old problem of weight vs. performance. For this test, I chose the Sony A7 series (specifically the A7R), Sony Vario-Tessar T* FE 24-70 f/4 ZA OSS Lens, Zeiss Loxia 50mm f/2 Planar T* Lens, Metabones adapter, and a Lowepro Flipside 300 Backpack. For night photography or long exposures you’ll need a lightweight tripod and tripod head. The Sony A7R renders images sharply due to its removed optical low-pass filter and high resolution 36MP sensor. The battery life is significantly shorter...