And… fight!

And… fight!

Canon says hello to Hollywood. For a few years now, Hollywood has had a burgeoning love affair with Canon’s EOS HDDSLRs, using them in productions ranging from Transformers to Captain America to TV shows like House. Now, Canon is making its formal entrance bid into Hollywood with the $20,000 Cinema EOS C300. Check out Canon’s new site dedicated to all things Cinema EOS. More importantly, check out our friend Vincent Laforet’s post on his newest video, Mobius, shot with the C300. There’s an awesome behind the scens video, both embedded here for your viewing pleasure. Mobius from Vincent Laforet on Vimeo.   Mobius :: Behind The Scenes from Blake Whitman on Vimeo. The camera looks pretty impressive and the video, if Mobius is any indication, is of excellent quality. The Super35 sensor is a 4K sensor, but captures a 1080p file, and Canon has a DSLR concept that can capture 24fps in the MotionJPEG codec at 4K resolution. Yeah, we’re salivating. 3 hours later, RED unveiled new specs, pricing and availability of their answer to the C300, the Scarlet-X. And what a coup – the Scarlet-X is all grown up. 5K at 12fps (that’s 14 megapixel stills at 12 frames per second) and 4K at up to 30fps, incredible dynamic range and a price that starts at $10,000. A fully equipped package, ready to shoot, minus lenses, is $14,000. It has the same sensor as it’s big brother, the EPIC; the difference in the two – besides the price – is the processing power in the camera’s brain; the EPIC can handle higher frames per second at higher resolutions because...
Tip of the week: Using a gimbal head

Tip of the week: Using a gimbal head

Every Thursday, we post a photography-related tip on our blog. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. One of the questions we get quite often from our customers is about photographing wildlife using long lenses. Here at BorrowLenses.com, we carry a wide variety of those lenses, like Canon’s 500mm, 600mm and 800mm lenses, as well as Nikon’s flagship 500mm and 600mm lenses. These are large lenses and can weight in excess of 10lbs, making hand-holding them incredibly impractical. A tripod is very important to have, but so is having the right kind of tripod head. A regular ballhead would work fine if your subject was stationary for the most part, but wildlife – particularly birds – aren’t known for staying still. Ballheads also pose a threat to your delicate lens as their heavy front elements have been known to cause the entire setup (lens, tripod, ballhead) to pitch forward if the tension is released too quickly. The best solution? Say hello to our littler friend, the gimbal head. Made by vendors such as Custom Brackets and Wimberley, these heads allow you to mount large lenses in a way that makes them almost weightless and lets you move the lens in a free and easy manner using just your fingertips. Let’s take a look at what you need to make this work. All these components were photographed, then assembled in the field, so what you see...
Tip of the week: Offloading your images quickly

Tip of the week: Offloading your images quickly

Every Thursday, we post a photography-related tip. These tips are inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. This week’s tip is inspired by something that we’ve heard asked many times; with today’s high resolution cameras, a 4GB, 8GB or even 16GB memory card may not be enough to hold all your images from a shoot, so you’ll need a safe way to offload the images and resume shooting.  Carrying multiple cards is always a good idea, but as anyone who’s dropped an SD memory card knows, those things are tiny and easy to lose. Replacing a lost card is easy. Replacing the images on it? Not so much. It’s also not always possible to offload the images to a laptop as well. So here’s our tip of the week: don’t let the lack of a computer prevent you from ensuring that your images are offloaded from your cards every night. We offer two great options for you to do this. The first is everyone’s favorite tablet, the Apple iPad. BorrowLenses.com rents the iPad 2 64GB WiFi edition and we send it to you with Apple’s Camera Connection kit so you can transfer images from your SD card directly to the iPad. If your camera uses CompactFlash cards, you can connect your camera to the iPad using the USB dongle (that’s part of the Camera Connection Kit) and transfer your images that way. The advantages of this method are clear...
Tip of the week: An adaptable camera system

Tip of the week: An adaptable camera system

Every Thursday, we will post a photography-related tip here. These tips are typically inspired by questions we get from our customers. Sometimes we might feature a technique tip, and sometimes a gear recommendation. If there’s something specific you’d like to see in this section, let us know. Email us at blog@borrowlenses.com. Today we’re going to talk about a video camera called the Panasonic AG AF100. The AF100 is from a family of products that adhere to the Micro Four-Thirds standard. So far, Olympus and Panasonic are the two manufacturers making cameras for this standard, but a number of other manufacturers have also signed on to produce add-ons for it. Sigma, Carl Zeiss, Lensbaby and Voigtlander, all venerable manufacturers, have signed on to make lenses for it. But the true power of this standard comes from the manufacturers that have built adapters that let you bring a variety of non Micro Four-Thirds lenses to this platform. Voigtlander and Redrock Micro are some of the companies that make adapters that will let you use Leica, Canon and Nikon lenses on a Micro Four-Thirds camera. The image above is of a Canon-mount CP.2 lens from Zeiss, with an adapter that let us put it on an Olympus E-P2 Micro Four-Thirds camera. There was a little play in the fit, but it worked well enough. The CP.2 was a lens designed specifically for video. With the same adapter shown in the image, you can also adapt that lens to the Panasonic AF100, opening up a wide range of cinematic possibilities. But that’s not all. Take that Nikon F mount adapter we rent and you can take Nikon’s...
Pros you should know: Syl Arena

Pros you should know: Syl Arena

“Pros you should know” is an ongoing Q&A series with photographers that the folks here at BorrowLenses.com admire and follow. Welcome to the first in a series of articles talking about some of the professionals in our field that the folks here at BorrowLenses.com think you should know. Today, we’d like to introduce you to Syl Arena. Syl Arena’s profile is pretty distinctive. If you want to spot him in a crowd, look for a head of fiery red hair. Chances are, if it sticks out in a halo, it’s Syl. Friendly, gregarious and blunt, he’s likely also talking to five people at once about everything from small flashes to motion and more. Syl first gained a steady following as a teacher and photographer when he started into the wilderness that was Canon flash photography at that time. His book, The Speedliter’s Handbook, is now considered required reading for anyone getting into Canon Speedlites, and has been recommended by no less a master than Joe McNally. The level of detail and effort that went into the book is staggering, especially when you consider that Syl was suffering from major back issues at the time. But if you think that speedlites are all that Syl is into, you’d be wrong. As you’ll see below, he’s into a whole lot more, from studio still shoots to location video shoots. Talk to him and you get the sense that Syl isn’t going to be known just as the guy who pretty-much conquered Canon flash photography. We were fortunate to get Syl to take time out of his schedule to answer the Q&A...