3 Things That Are Annoying About The Sony FS7

3 Things That Are Annoying About The Sony FS7

San Francisco-based freelance filmmaker and photographer Matt Maniego recently had the opportunity to see how the new Sony FS7 would stand up to the standard of his professional shooting needs. His films have been featured by the three major Bay Area professional sports teams and his requirements are high quality RAW recording and relatively lightweight rigs for his run-and-gun shooting style. Here he breaks down why the Sony FS7 may be the camera he’s been waiting for…but is perhaps not perfect yet! Read on to see if the the Sony FS7 is the camera for you. 3 Things That Are Annoying About The Sony FS7 by Matt Maniego I’ve shot on many cameras before, including the Canon 5D Mark III, Canon C300, Sony FS700, RED Scarlet/Dragon, Black Magic Cinema/4K Production. You name it, I’ve probably shot on it. But none of them had all of the features I wanted at an appealing price point…until now. When I was hired to document the Golden State Warriors championship run I wanted a camera that was lightweight, easy to use, and shot 4K/SlowMo internally. Borrowlenses suggested I try the Sony FS7. I had read many great reviews about it and it did suit my needs well. The good outweigh the bad, so I’ll start with what I really liked about shooting with the Sony FS7. Benefit 1: SLog3 This alone is probably the best part about shooting on the Sony FS7. The ability to capture so much detail on a compressed codec is amazing! The camera captures plenty of detail in highlights and shadows that’s on par with much more expensive cameras. It’s definitely not RAW, but it’s also not a bajillion gigabytes per minute (if any...
Behind the Scenes with Niki Lazaridou on ‘Fine China’ Fashion Story

Behind the Scenes with Niki Lazaridou on ‘Fine China’ Fashion Story

Freelance fashion photographer Niki Lazaridou is an up and coming talent who in just 6 years has managed to collaborate with Fashion TV, Photo Vogue, and several other fashion publications. Niki works with many teams of professionals in order to produce her unique style. In this “Behind the Shot” she graciously allowed us a look at what it takes to pull off her elaborate photoshoots and what it took to create an editorial that resembles a different era. by Niki Lazaridou Casually strolling around Salem as a tourist with my camera I came across a beautiful modern museum made of glass and concrete which I quickly found out was Peabody Essex Museum. Little did I know that behind the modern façade was a hidden gem that travelled all the way from a small Chinese village. A 200 hundred year old house that was carefully set apart, transferred piece by piece, and reassembled, stood gloriously in front of my eyes. I was instantly inspired and knew I wanted to shoot in there more than anything. Upon organizing a photoshoot inspired by the space, the first challenge was to get a release form, which took approximately seven months in total to obtain. Each room had separate licenses that required many different offices and curators to approve but after much persistence we gained access. Another challenge with this project was finding original Chinese garments that complimented the location. A designer I collaborated with imported fabrics from China and also reached out to the Chinese Opera of Boston that provided costumes from their original collections. We were given strict guidelines on how to tell the models to behave when wearing these...
Lightweight Hiking and Travel Alternatives

Lightweight Hiking and Travel Alternatives

Guest contributor Mark Shastany comes to us from the Borrowlenses.com VIP department to share his gear knowledge with the BL community! Shastany is a Boston-based photographer specializing in portraiture, commercial work, and landscape. He recently took a trip to the Catskills, NY and needed a lightweight solution that matched his personal standard of quality output. Mark graciously shared what he chose to bring, why, and what in hindsight he’d consider amending to make his kit more efficient and lightweight for next time! Lightweight Hiking and Travel Alternatives by Mark Shastany For Hiking and travel, you are often limited by the weight and size of the gear you choose to bring. In a scenario like this, there is often a sacrifice to be considered when attempting pro-grade images that are traditionally accomplished with large, heavy lenses and DSLR bodies. However, there are viable alternatives that work out nicely, cutting down on size and weight without compromising image quality. On a recent hike in the Catskills in New York, I performed a field test to find out what worked well for lightweight, high quality hiking alternatives – and what didn’t. Mirrorless systems provide great solutions to the age-old problem of weight vs. performance. For this test, I chose the Sony A7 series (specifically the A7R), Sony Vario-Tessar T* FE 24-70 f/4 ZA OSS Lens, Zeiss Loxia 50mm f/2 Planar T* Lens, Metabones adapter, and a Lowepro Flipside 300 Backpack. For night photography or long exposures you’ll need a lightweight tripod and tripod head. The Sony A7R renders images sharply due to its removed optical low-pass filter and high resolution 36MP sensor. The battery life is significantly shorter...
Behind The Scenes: Gold Suit Man Brings Luck to Golden State Warriors

Behind The Scenes: Gold Suit Man Brings Luck to Golden State Warriors

Matt Maniego, a freelance filmmaker and photographer based in San Francisco, was recently asked to document the National Championship Finals for NBA’s Golden State Warriors. His films and features have been featured by the “Big 3” Bay Area Pro Sports teams: San Francisco Giants, the 49ers, and the Golden State Warriors. Here he takes us Behind the Shot as he documented the GS Warriors win the first NBA title in 40 years: BL: How did you get in the exact position to grab this shot? MM: On assignment with the Warriors, they wanted me to follow a season ticket holder, Oliver Wald, nicknamed the “Gold Suit Man”. He became a known figure by Warrior fans after being featured on TV in last year’s playoffs. We documented his typical game day: pre-game rituals, his commute to the game, and his famous in game dance moves. It was great to capture Oliver during the game, but the best moment was after the Warriors had won. BL: Was it planned or perfect timing? MM: The moment was pretty much perfect timing. We shot a bunch during the game, but when the confetti starting raining down, I said to myself, “Please do the Scutaro.” If you don’t know what “Scutaro” means, it was a shot made famous by Marco Scutaro in the 2012 NLCS. Here is a photo of that moment: I think my psychic powers kicked in because he did the very thing I asked. He did the Scutaro! Before this show however, I instinctively switched to super slow mo on the FS7 (180fps) and made sure I was shooting pretty shallow to give more...
Time Lapsing Against the Clock: How to Shoot a Time Lapse with a Stadium Full of Warriors Fans

Time Lapsing Against the Clock: How to Shoot a Time Lapse with a Stadium Full of Warriors Fans

Matt Maniego, a freelance filmmaker and photographer based in San Francisco, was recently asked to document the promotional efforts of NBA’s Golden State Warriors. His specialty time lapse work has been featured by the San Francisco Giants, the 49ers, and the Golden State Warriors, as well as the Pac-12 Network, Comcast SportsNet, and the NFL Network, just to name a few. Here he takes us along for the ride and shares his tips for getting the perfect time lapse. Time Lapsing Against the Clock by Matt Maniego At this very moment, Oracale Arena, aka ‘Roaracle’, is not just audibly the loudest arena in the NBA but is also visually. A sea of bright yellow t-shirts cover each and every seat in the house and I have been asked to capture how these yellow shirts made it from the boxes, to the seats, and eventually onto 20,000 Warrior fans. BEHIND THE SCENES My team and I had 4 hours to capture the evolution of the promo shirts. With that large an area I split my team into two, with one remaining to capture the behind-the-scenes footage. Our main goal was to capture captivating time lapses. To accomplish this feat under pressure we brought with us: Canon 5D Mark III Canon 5D Mark II Canon 6D Canon 7D Canon 16-35 f2.8L II Canon 24-70 f2.8L II Rokinon 14mm f2.8 Emotimo TB3 Dynamic Perceptions Stage Zero Dolly Dynamic Perceptions Stage One Dolly Induro AT413 Tripods x 5 Fancier Ballheads x 5 64GB Compact Flash x 5 Canon Remote Trigger (for backup) If you’re not familiar with time lapse lingo, the rigs you see in the above video are “Motion...