Stock Photography that Gives Back: Winners of the Call to Action Contest

Stock Photography that Gives Back: Winners of the Call to Action Contest

StudentStock isn’t your average stock photography site. It’s populated by imagery created by students of all ages and a certain percentage of the proceeds goes towards scholarships. Started by a couple of photography teachers, StudentStock is a launchpad for students who are creating great work but need a platform for selling. It helps beginning photographers grow their skills, develop a sense of what sells, and, ultimately, be a part of the stock photography marketplace that is often so hard to find success in. The following photographers are on that path to success. They recently won the Call to Action photo contest, put on by StudentStock with support from BorrowLenses. See their winning entries below! 1st Place: Kirk Yarnell – California State University, East Bay Taken in Bend, Oregon during a roundup, Yarnell captured this back in 1994 so, yes kids, this was taken on film! Yarnell has been shooting since 1980 and currently lives in Mt. Shasta, California. 2nd Place: Shannon Fuller – Butte College Fuller tried to get this shot with 4 different dogs before getting the exact one she was looking for. She used a Nikon 70-200mm to capture this moment from a distance to avoid getting soaked herself! She froze the action at 1/1600th of a second. 3rd Place: Ben Meester – Butte College After a storm, Meester set out to one of his favorite back-country spots in Tahoe to get this shot. He used a Canon 14mm for an effective vista of the first run of the day. Runner Up: Aaron Alvarez – Santa Ann College Taken at Newport Beach, CA with a Canon 5D...
The Beginner Videographer’s Guide to Frequency Blocks

The Beginner Videographer’s Guide to Frequency Blocks

Wireless mics are an essential part of documentary filmmaking. The mics are small and easily hidden from view and the wires are minimal. If you’ve seen a reality show (if so, my condolences), sometimes you get a peek at the metal mound protruding out of the backs of people’s clothes. Those are lavaliers and they are handy. They are used often by wedding videographers since shotgun mics aren’t super awesome at picking up the vows from clear across a church. You don’t see them as often in movies because people have to actually wear them (and that is distracting) but for sit-down interviews, or most TV applications, they’re great. If you’re just starting to get into any of these fields, read up on frequency blocks – you’ll impress (if mildly) your sound tech. What are Frequency Blocks? There are a finite number of frequencies that are allowed to be used in different parts of the world. The frequencies are a range of hertz units that are divided into “blocks” and certain countries cover certain blocks and not others. For a quick refresher, hertz measurement is the number of waves that pass/vibrate per second. So different blocks cover different ranges of frequencies. For example, Block 22 is universally understood to cover 563200000Hz – 588700000Hz (or, more commonly denoted in MHz: 563.200 – 588.700). Why Do Frequency Blocks Matter? There are a lot of people out there trying to use wireless systems. There has to be a certain amount of organization and regulation to keep everything from interfering with each other all of the time. So a certain number of blocks have...
Beginner’s Guide to Achieving Better Flash Photos

Beginner’s Guide to Achieving Better Flash Photos

Using a flash gun, such as a Nikon Speedlight or Canon Speedlite, is designed mainly to be used off-camera and fired optically or via a radio. However, there are situations when time or gear restraints force you to keep your flash on the hotshoe to be used as an overly powerful pop-up flash. Here is the quickest way to take advantage of your external flash when its stuck on your camera. Bouncing Flash off Ceilings Most flashes will have rotating heads. It’s instinct to just point the face of the flash right at the face of your subject but resist! Instead, point your flash straight up at the ceiling. This is particularly effective if you have white ceilings. Straight flash is good at one thing: illuminating your scene. It can illuminate to a fault, though, leaving washed-out faces and unwanted specular highlights. It’s also a fairly small source of light so the falloff is really quick – look at how dark the background is. When I bounce my flash off of the ceiling, the light spreads farther and is softer. It is also less strong so you might need to either strengthen the power on your flash or strengthen the light sensitivity settings on your camera. I didn’t need to for this scene because my ceiling was low enough for my light to not have to travel too far before bouncing back. Notice that the background is better illuminated in this scene thanks to the light spread the ceiling provides when hit with flash. Also notice how much more pleasing the catchlights are in the baby’s eyes versus before....
The Elegant Simplicity of Building a MyPublisher Photo Album

The Elegant Simplicity of Building a MyPublisher Photo Album

For professionals and hobbyists alike, photo books are usually on our to-do list and get postponed because they’re often expensive, take time to build, and the quality is unpredictable. They are worth making because they can be awesome keepsakes or portfolios. There is something about the tactile experience of flipping through the pages of a real book. Swiping on an iPad just isn’t the same. I am on the hunt for a great photo book company. Here are my personal observations after trying out MyPublisher. The Elegant Simplicity of Building a MyPublisher Photo Book by Alex Huff Photo books often fall into two camps: kitschy scrapbook or modern minimalist. When tasked with a MyPublisher review, I was hesitant at first. I didn’t want to take the time to learn the ins and outs of building a good portfolio book and I also didn’t want to be limited to decorative “themes” for events I don’t have pictures for (think “baby shower” embellishments). I’m relieved to say that MyPublisher does it all, to one’s taste, and easily. Workflow: MyPublisher Book Maker To get started, you will need to download the MyPublisher Book Maker for either PC and Mac. Here is my quick takeaway on using it: The Pros: Drag and drop functionality. Integrates with your local files and folders (and, in their recent update, with your Facebook account if you opt for it). “Check Price” button to make sure you aren’t going over your personal budget (I LOVE this). Ability to share your finished project with others for review. Small program that doesn’t take up a lot of space (around 32MB)....
A Beginning Photographer’s Guide to Photographing The Northern Lights

A Beginning Photographer’s Guide to Photographing The Northern Lights

Dean J. Tatooles specializes in fine art panoramic landscape photography, wildlife photography, and indigenous portraiture from remote locations around the world. He also works with top-rated travel companies and fellow professional photographers to lead photographic safaris in India, Kenya, Iceland and more. Fresh off a trip in Iceland, Tatooles and colleague Tim Vollmer answer some common questions about the eerie natural anomaly known as the Aurora Borealis. If shooting the Northern Lights is on your photographic bucket list, be sure to check out their tips below, which have been gathered from years of experience. A Beginning Photographer’s Guide to Photographing The Northern Lights by Dean J. Tatooles What are the Northern Lights? At some point in our lives, each of us has either heard stories about or seen images of dancing lights in the far north of our planet. Undoubtedly, this spectacle is beautiful but what exactly are the “Northern Lights” and where do they come from? The “Northern Lights”, or Aurora Borealis, are a series of discharged particles (or solar wind) emanating from our sun that penetrate Earth’s magnetic shield and create light when combined with atoms and molecules (such as nitrogen and oxygen) when entering our atmosphere. How far do these particles travel before colliding with Earth? The discharged particles travel over 150 million kilometers, or about 90 million miles, through space toward Earth before being drawn in to the Polar Regions by our planet’s magnetic force. Amazingly, solar wind only takes about 2 to 3 days to travel this staggering distance. Are they harmful to us or our planet? No, solar wind collisions with Earth’s magnetic field occurs...