Sample Images: Benefits of Shooting Olympus and Four Thirds/Micro Four Thirds

Sample Images: Benefits of Shooting Olympus and Four Thirds/Micro Four Thirds

Mirrorless cameras and the Micro Four Thirds (MFT) system are gaining in popularity. From Panasonic’s GH3 to the Blackmagic, more and more cameras are coming out in MFT mount. Olympus originally pioneered the Four Thirds system and, along with Panasonic, announced a new Micro Four Thirds standard in 2008. This new system increased in quality while decreasing in bulk. Olympus Micro Four Thirds Cameras and Lens Variety Olympus carries three main breeds of camera: Digital SLR, OM-D, and the Pen. Their DSLRs are Four Thirds Mount and the OM-D and Pens are Micro Four Thirds. While Four Thirds and MFT lenses cannot be used interchangeably, what is nice about  MFT is that it aims to be a universal mounting system for mirrorless cameras. There are several brands outside of Olympus that make MFT lenses that mount well on the OM-D and Pen cameras. This opens up your lens experimentation options. For instance, while manual-focus only, the Voigtlander Nokton 25mm and 17.5mm lenses for MFT open up to a very wide 0.95 f/stop, a rare feature. You can also use extremely low-profile pancake lenses, such as the Panasonic Lumix 20mm f/1.7 for MFT. For reach, there is the Panasonic 45-200mm Mega Optical Image Stabilization lens or Olympus’ own fast 75mm  f/1.8, whose 9-blade diaphragm produces excellent bokeh. If you are into experimenting with many lenses at once without being married to 1 particular brand and without killing yourself trying to carry them all, then give the MFT system a shot. Keep in mind when choosing your MFT lens that MFT sensors have a crop factor of 2.0 (as opposed to...
BorrowLenses Education: Featured Photographer Lawrence Chan

BorrowLenses Education: Featured Photographer Lawrence Chan

Technique, knowledge, inspiration – gain it all from seasoned photographers with years of experience and many tips to share with both burgeoning photographers and pros looking to gain a new perspective. Visit our entire collection of interviews, which are full of amazing images and valuable advice. Lawrence Chan is a marketing strategist for smart creatives. He is also a photographer and traveler and is the author of several books on marketing and social media. His work has been published in Grace Ormonde Wedding Style Magazine. He is a lover of tofu, Chipotle, wonton noodles, and Starbucks Iced Americano. BL: What is your photographic specialty and how did you become interested in it? Chan: It started out as wedding photography but I am slowly shifting to landscape photography due to my extensive travels. BL: How long have you been teaching and/or writing about photography and how would you describe your teaching/writing style? Chan: I have been teaching in the photography industry for almost four years. My goal is to dissect complex marketing and psychology studies and gear them toward entrepreneurs. BL: What is your single most depended on photographic item–aside from your camera? Chan: The one lens I always bring with me when traveling is my Canon 16-35mm. BL: What type of gear, new or old, are you most interested in experimenting with? Chan: In the future, I’d like to sample Hasselblad. BL: Describe what prompted or inspired you to create Found – Be Discovered by Those Who Matter? Chan: With my success in generating leads, I wanted to share one of my methods, which was harnessing the power of photography in...
Featured Photographer Guy Tal

Featured Photographer Guy Tal

Technique, knowledge, inspiration – gain it all from seasoned photographers with years of experience and many tips to share with both burgeoning photographers and pros looking to gain a new perspective. Visit our entire collection of interviews, which are full of amazing images and valuable advice. Guy Tal is a professional artist, author, photographer, educator and public speaker. He believes that the practice of creative pursuits manifests not only in the making of art, but also has the ability to transform and enrich life, facilitate meaningful and rewarding experiences, and foster contentment and satisfaction through life-long discovery and learning. His work has been featured in Outdoor Photographer, Popular Photography, and Digital Photographer magazines, among many others. BL: What is your photographic specialty and how did you become interested in it? Tal: My goal is to create images that are personally significant and that communicate something of the state of mind and relationship with the subject that inspired them. In a sense, what I’m after is a more nuanced version of what Alfred Stieglitz called “equivalence,” as in implying something equivalent to the photographer’s experience in all its dimensions, both visual and emotional. In my mind, the best images are not images OF things; they are images ABOUT things. My favorite subject matter is the landscape of my home, the Colorado Plateau. I first became interested in these places as a young soldier, thousands of miles and a lifetime away, on the Golan Heights. By coincidence, or perhaps not, I found a copy of Edward Abbey’s “Desert Solitaire” and became fascinated with his descriptions. At the time I couldn’t even hope to see...
Three Key Methods For Backing Up Your Photographs

Three Key Methods For Backing Up Your Photographs

Zach Egolf is an IT professional and freelance photographer in the Baltimore area. In this guest post, he explains three methods for backing up your files in preparation for the worst possible scenario. The Importance of Back…Back…Backing Up reprinted with permission by Zach Egolf Wandering into the world of photography without a backup plan is a lot like wandering into…well, just about anything blindfolded!  You might think you know the terrain, how to navigate it, and where you’re going, but the next thing you know you’ve wandered into a forest, caught yourself on some thorn bushes, and lost your pants.  And much like losing your pants in an evil forest, losing your photos can be a frightening ordeal. Think of this scenario: You spend 10 hours shooting the perfect wedding.  The colors are all perfect, the lighting is spot-on, the bride and groom photograph like the two greatest love birds in the world.  You get home to your computer, pull all of the photos off of your memory cards, and then go to bed.  A wedding is a long day, after all, and you want to get your rest so that you can wake up the next morning and start working your magic! The next day comes along and you start to edit the photos.  Two days pass, you’re halfway through the photos and, all of a sudden, a freak storm rolls through town and zaps your house, frying your external hard drives, and wiping out 10 hours worth of photos.  You have nothing to deliver to your clients except the crisp shell of metal and magnets.  You have...
BorrowLenses Education: Featured Photographer Enzo Dal Verme

BorrowLenses Education: Featured Photographer Enzo Dal Verme

Technique, knowledge, inspiration – gain it all from seasoned photographers with years of experience and many tips to share with both burgeoning photographers and pros looking to gain a new perspective. Visit our entire collection of interviews, which are full of amazing images and valuable advice. Enzo Dal Verme’s work has been published in Vanity Fair, l’Uomo Vogue, Vogue Sport, The Times, Marie Claire, Gioia, Grazia, Flair, Amica, D di Repubblica, l’Espresso, Madame Figarò, Elle, Glamour, Class, Max, Panorama and many other magazines. He is currently based in Milan. BL: What is your photographic specialty and how did you become interested in it? Dal Verme: For over a decade I have been shooting reportage. I traveled wherever in the world I could find an encouraging and uplifting story to report or an inspiring portrait to shoot. To me one of the interesting things is the traveling itself – it’s going from one place to another and being exposed to all of the contradictions. What is taken for granted in one place is absolutely unimaginable somewhere else. What is considered “good” in one country is seen as “really bad” in another. Everything is relative. In Algeria, I saw women swimming completely covered with black veils and wearing black gloves. In Miami or in Rio you can see women almost naked and with plenty of plastic surgery. I enjoy observing reality from many different angles and photography gives me the opportunity to do so. In other words, I experience my profession as an exciting exploration of the world and, above all, of myself. In fact, because of my work, sometimes I find myself out of...