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Small Flash, Big Box: Using the LumoPro Flash Bracket

Gear Talk The LumoPro Flash Bracket

There’s no shortage of lighting modifiers for small flashes like the Nikon SB–910 on the market today. From the Apollo softboxes we rent, to grid kits, snoots, umbrellas, and beauty dishes, small flash has really come into its own, especially for photographers working on location.

Now there’s a new accessory for Strobist-style shooters that will let you use a much wider variety of softboxes with your existing small flashes, including the high-end modifiers from companies like Profoto. I used it with two Profoto softboxes a couple of weeks ago for a portrait, with excellent results.

The acecssory is called the Lumopro Speedring Bracket, and it’s basically a softbox speedring modified to let you use one or two flashes in a standard softbox.

If you’re not familiar with speedrings and softboxes, take a look at the article “Understanding Softboxes” on our blog. It describes what speedrings are, and how they are used with various modifiers.

The Lumopro bracket is essentially a speedring with two adjustable arms protruding from it. A standard stud allows you to to mount the speedring onto a swivel adapter so you can tilt your setup to angle it.

Two Nikon DB-910 Flashes on the LumoPro Stand (the Plus III radio in this image was swapped out for a FlexTT5 in my shoot)

Two Nikon DB-910 Flashes on the LumoPro Stand (the Plus III radio in this image was swapped out for a FlexTT5 in my shoot)

I was doing a shoot for costume designer Katherine Nowacki, who needed a bright, airy headshot for her website. I placed her on a balcony with setting sun directly behind her to act as a rim light. My initial idea was to use a reflector to get some fill light into her face, but then decided I wanted something more powerful to balance out the ambient.

I went with two Profoto softboxes, a 3’ Octabox and a 1×4’ strip box. Using the Lumopro bracket, I put two SB–910 flashes in the Octabox and one SB–910 in the strip box.

The Lighting Setup

The Lighting Setup

Since the flashes sit on the outside of the box, you can actually use an on-camera flash as a commander. In my shoot, I employed PocketWizard FlexTT5 radios on all the flashes, and a FlexTT5 + AC3 Zone Controller on my camera to trigger the flashes.

Balancing the sunlight became easy then. I just dialed my flash power remotely from the AC3 Zone controller, and was able to make the image I wanted.

The Final Image

The Final Image

The bracket works with all our Profoto, Bowens, and Photoflex softboxes, greatly expanding the range of modifiers you can use with your small flashes. Being able to group two into a single box gives you the choice of upping your exposure by a full f-stop, or powering the lights down for faster recycle times.

The LumoPro bracket is available now, and comes with a swivel adapter to make mounting on a lightstand as well as tilting the whole setup up and down a cinch. Rent it now for just $9 for a 3-day rental.

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Sohail Mamdani is a writer and photographer based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter, Facebook or Google+. You can find his portfolio on his website at sohail.me as well as on 500px and Flickr.

Comments

  • Wow, this will be fantastic for outdoor portraits (especially in Maine where we lose light fast in Fall/Spring.) I will have to order some of these!

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  • Ray says:

    Sorry for the late comment…
    In that BTS shot, you have one Plus III attached to just one of the speedlights. Did that work for you? In daylight? i.e. just one Plus III for one speedlight, and the other speedlight on optical sync? Or did you have to use two Plus IIIs? (1 Plus III per speedlight)

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